Archive for the ‘SPI’ Category

TicTocTrac: track your perception of time

Monday, May 14th, 2012

TicTocTrac Wristwatch

Brian Schiffer and Sima Mitra, from Cornell University, propose a very nice wristwatch that allows you to keep track of your time perception, using a method known as duration production: TicTocTrac.

Human perception of time is typically distorted, due to the different amount of information and experiences acquired everyday. TicTocTrac lets you to estimate your own perception, first by signaling the perceived duration of a given event and, then, by comparing it with the actual event duration. Finally, all the information can easily be saved to a micro SD card.

The hardware is based on a Atmega32u4, a DS3234S real-time clock and several leds to display time, while the software part is mostly based on Arduino’s DS3234S RTC library.

More information can be found here.

[Via: TicTocTrac]

Portable, DIY Disco Dance Floor

Friday, December 9th, 2011

[Rave Rover's Chris Williamson] made a portable DIY dancefloor, sharing instructions and schematics.

Like with many projects similar to this, an Arduino board controls pretty much everything. The floor is dominated by powerful LED lights, which respond to a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI). A small computer is also inside (complete with Wi-fi), along with a car radio hooked up to speakers. Oh, and thanks to additional wheelchair motors, the floor can be wheeled away to wherever it’s needed.

Chris managed to build the dance floor in just one month, and documented how to do it on Instructables for anyone who wants to make their own. And now you’ve seen this, would you really want to throw a party without one?

via [PCworld] source [Instructables]

Arduino and NanoNote put together

Monday, March 14th, 2011

David Reyes, aka Tuxbrain, one of the Arduino distributors in Spain, has just brought to life one of the coolest hacks I have seen for some time. He managed to reflash Arduino Uno from a Ben NanoNote. He has implemented a text-based IDE that can reflash the boards directly from the NanoNote without using external power. If you want to have a device to reprogram your ATmega processors without having to bring your computer around, this can be a great solution. Just remember, this is an advanced hack, you should be familiar to the use of CLI (Command Line Interface), but David has promised taking a look at Qt-creator and put together a small text editor with uploading capabilities. Stay tuned at Tuxbrain’s development website!

 

 

 

Arduino and NanoNote put together

(c) 2011 Picture courtesy of Tuxbrain

 

On Tuxbrain, thanks to the Qi-HardwareAVRFreaks communities and to the little UBB board, we have successfully flash an Arduino board from Ben NanoNote without need of external power, directly connecting a cable from the NanoNote 8:10 bay to the ICSP header on Arduino, also without need of bootloader in the Atmega328 chip, in fact NanoNote can flash the bootloaders :) , and in theory Nanonote can flash whatever  avrdude compatible chip without need of any board (untested yet). Making the little Ben the first AVR microcontroller programmer in the world able to edit the source code, building it, listen music or play Supertux at same time, in same device, not bad for only 99€ ;)

 

Must-See Beginner Tutorials For Arduino

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

[Jeremy] made ten Tutorials about Arduino worth our “All Stars” category. He talks about different themes: Blinking Leds [Intro & #2], Electrical Engineering  [#3],  Analog Inputs [#4], Motors & Transistors [#5], Serial Communication & Processing [#6], I2C & Processing [#7], SPI Interfaces [#8], Wireless Communication [#9] and Interrupts [#10].

Thanks to a generous sponsorship from element14, I’m putting together a tutorial series on using the arduino microcontroller platform!  The arduino is a platform that I’ve done several projects with, and I think it is the best possible way for beginners to get acquainted with electronics.  This tutorial series will be aimed at beginner users, but I’m hoping to keep it going with some more advanced topics a few episodes into the future.

thanks Jeremy! ++

via [JeremyBlum] [Element14]

Make Your Own Solenoids And Play XylophoneMake Your Own Solenoids And Play XylophoneMake Your Own Solenoids And Play Xylophone

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]

 

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]

 

Tired Of A 10 Bit Res? Hook Up A Better Analog-To-Digital ConverterTired Of A 10 Bit Res? Hook Up A Better Analog-To-Digital ConverterTired Of A 10 Bit Res? Hook Up A Better Analog-To-Digital Converter

Monday, November 29th, 2010

 

[Martin Nawrath] from Lab3, Cologne, made a nice  ADC tutorial based on the 18bit LTC2400:

If the resolution of the Arduino is not enough for your application you have to try it with a better ADC. The LTC2400 gives you a resolution of up to 24 bit at a datarate of 5 samples per seconds  and is quite  simple to connect. With this device you can connect sensors which have only a low output level like thermo couples or force strain gauges. The high sensitivity can make the use of  of an preamp needless.

[Martin Nawrath] from Lab3, Cologne, made a nice ADC tutorial based on the 18bit LTC2400:

If the resolution of the Arduino is not enough for your application you have to try it with a better ADC. The LTC2400 gives you a resolution of up to 24 bit at a datarate of 5 samples per seconds and is quite simple to connect. With this device you can connect sensors which have only a low output level like thermo couples or force strain gauges. The high sensitivity can make the use of of an preamp needless.

 

[Martin Nawrath] from Lab3, Cologne, made a nice  ADC tutorial based on the 18bit LTC2400:

If the resolution of the Arduino is not enough for your application you have to try it with a better ADC. The LTC2400 gives you a resolution of up to 24 bit at a datarate of 5 samples per seconds  and is quite  simple to connect. With this device you can connect sensors which have only a low output level like thermo couples or force strain gauges. The high sensitivity can make the use of  of an preamp needless.

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