Archive for the ‘Protocols’ Category

Ball of Dub Keeps Audio in Your Hands

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Ball of Dub from LUSTlab on Vimeo.

Accelerometer to Renoise via OSC  to control trippy and dubby sounds.

[Lizzie] from LustLab sent in her Ball of Dub that turns a few accelerometer and a digital audio workstation and turns everything into an aural experience of wubs and dubs. The Ball of Dub can turn just about anything into dubstep, and does so with a fairly interesting user interface.

There isn’t a build log for the Ball of Dub, but  the folks at LustLab did send in a basic overview of her project. Inside the ball, there’s a Razor IMU from Sparkfun that is attached to the ever-popular XBee wireless transceiver. A tiny program on an Arduino calibrates the gyroscope and accelerometer and sends that data to the DAW at 50Hz.

The host computer is running Renoise, a very popular tracker that can accept MIDI and OSC input. A Processing app parses the ball spin, free fall and impact, averages them over a period of time, and pipes that into the OSC input of Renoise. In [Lizzie]‘s video, the ball spin is sent to a low-pass filter on the baseline track, and the average impact is applied to the vocal track.

via [HackADay] source [LustLab Tumblr] special demo video for the few skeptical comments on HackADay

Listening To The Walls' Whispers

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

[Pierre] shares an interesting geo-localization project of sound, narration and  culture,  made in  “plan d’Aou”, a district of Marseilles – France. The project dates back in September 2010, within the framework of the Smala project in order to trace a sound cartography of Islam in the city of Marseilles: the guys at [Echelle Inconnue] took their time to fully document the all project with schematics, codes, fritzing diagrams and so on.

Several mobile systems were distributed to the people to accompany their walk across the district with, by hand, a kind of speaker to be press on the walls which makes it possible to listen to the sound by vibrating the material of the wall.

The materials of urban furniture or buildings become the speakers required for sound diffusion. Each resonant body had its acoustic specificities, the words take shape in metal, wood or glass… Textures of the sound fluctuate from a surface to another and the listener must juggle with these characteristics to obtain a quality of optimal listening, between documentary in the walls and poetic sound creation.

source [echelleinconnue]

Listening To The Walls’ Whispers

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

[Pierre] shares an interesting geo-localization project of sound, narration and  culture,  made in  “plan d’Aou”, a district of Marseilles – France. The project dates back in September 2010, within the framework of the Smala project in order to trace a sound cartography of Islam in the city of Marseilles: the guys at [Echelle Inconnue] took their time to fully document the all project with schematics, codes, fritzing diagrams and so on.

Several mobile systems were distributed to the people to accompany their walk across the district with, by hand, a kind of speaker to be press on the walls which makes it possible to listen to the sound by vibrating the material of the wall.

The materials of urban furniture or buildings become the speakers required for sound diffusion. Each resonant body had its acoustic specificities, the words take shape in metal, wood or glass… Textures of the sound fluctuate from a surface to another and the listener must juggle with these characteristics to obtain a quality of optimal listening, between documentary in the walls and poetic sound creation.

source [echelleinconnue]

Build Your Own Undersea Robot

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

David Schneider from [IEEEspectrum] tells and shares his DIY Remotely Operated Vehicle undersea, based on two Arduinos

Last year at about this time, crews in the Gulf of Mexico were working feverishly to bring BP’s blown-out oil well under control. Some of the more spectacular parts of that effort, as you may recall, involved the use of remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs. Perhaps you had the same thought as I did—that it would be cool to build one.

And shares all the instructions to build your own [.zip].

via [IEEESpectrum]

The Laundruino Lets You Know When Your Clothes Are Done Over The Net

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

[Micha] has a washing machine with an inaccurate  time data displayed on the front panel. How to solve this?

Since it is located in his basement, he hated having to check on the machine continually to know when his clothes were done. Instead of hauling up and down the stairs over and over, he decided to hack in an “end of cycle” notifier of his own.

The washer has an LED that lights when it is finally done doing its thing, so [Micha] removed the LED and soldered in two wires, which he then connected to his Arduino. When the washer is finished and the LED should be lit, the Arduino senses that the input has been pulled low, signaling the end of the cycle. The Arduino was hooked into his home network via an Ethernet shield, enabling him to monitor the process from the comfort of the nearest web browser.

via [hackAday] source [blog.fsfe]

IAAC's CAN-Based Interactive Architectures

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Barcelona-based IAAC school is hosting a summer school (in Barcelona and Mumbay). The theme of this year’s course is creating an urban tool of a networked city based on a new informational layer.

What happens if we think Urbanism and Energy through a new informational layer added in our cities?

(more…)

IAAC’s CAN-Based Interactive Architectures

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Barcelona-based IAAC school is hosting a summer school (in Barcelona and Mumbay). The theme of this year’s course is creating an urban tool of a networked city based on a new informational layer.

What happens if we think Urbanism and Energy through a new informational layer added in our cities?

(more…)

Easytransfer Library Makes Arduino2Arduino Communication Easy

Thursday, June 2nd, 2011

Making an Arduino communicating with another Arduino implies the use of a protocol. Most of the time is a DIY protocol that suits your needs (e.g. sending simple bytes/string etc) made for that project.

[Bill Porter] took care of this problem by creating a library called EasyTransfer

In most of my own projects I define and write my own NMEA standard communication protocols. This makes communications human readable and easy to debug, but proves wasteful with bandwidth and processing power so it’s not right for every application. Binary communications is much more efficient and versatile, but requires careful handling. This library abstracts the finer points of packetized serial communication away from the user so it easy to use and understand.

via [HackADay] source [BillPorter]

Tutorial: Arduino UNO + Google's ADK

Monday, May 30th, 2011

[Alex TC] from [Bricogeek] posted a tutorial about how to interface Arduino and Android replacing the ADK shield by Google with commonc sensors and actuators.

[few days ago] ADK  was presented on Google’s blog, a platform that enables communication between Android and Arduino. The downside was that the development kit costs around 300 €.

Today we bring you a scoop. After seeing different people online who managed to run the ADK on  Arduino with a USB Host Shield controlling a servo or LED, we intend to play all the devices included in the kit but in our BricoGeek DIY version, with the products we have available in the store.

via [bricogeek]

Tutorial: Arduino UNO + Google’s ADK

Monday, May 30th, 2011

[Alex TC] from [Bricogeek] posted a tutorial about how to interface Arduino and Android replacing the ADK shield by Google with commonc sensors and actuators.

[few days ago] ADK  was presented on Google’s blog, a platform that enables communication between Android and Arduino. The downside was that the development kit costs around 300 €.

Today we bring you a scoop. After seeing different people online who managed to run the ADK on  Arduino with a USB Host Shield controlling a servo or LED, we intend to play all the devices included in the kit but in our BricoGeek DIY version, with the products we have available in the store.

via [bricogeek]