Archive for the ‘MIDI’ Category

MIDI with Arduino

Monday, September 10th, 2012

We have already mentioned the fantastic work of Amanda Ghassei for Instructables in this post.
I would like to report two other very useful documents.

The first is What is MIDI? and explain in detail how MIDI protocol works. The second, even more important is Send and Receive MIDI with Arduino. Please note, regarding the Midi input schematic, the use of  the 6N138 opto-isolator. Some MIDI interface schematics show the 4N25 opto-isolator which is a single transistor type, but the 6N138 shown there produces a much better output signal.

Via:[Instructables]

 

Arduino-based theremin

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Theremin is one of the most exiting musical instruments ever made, mainly because of its “quite odd” playing method. Infact, its working principle is based on near-filed coupling between the hands of the theremin player and two metal antennas, used to determine the pitch of a variable-frequency oscillator and to adjust the volume of the output signal, respectively.
Several theremin implementation are possible, such as the “original” analog one (based on the mixing of two sine waves originated by a fixed-frequency oscillator and a variable-frequency one) and those based on digital techniques.
LabIII guys implemented a nice and simple Arduino theremin module, based on a TTL LC-type oscillator, usable not only to play electronic music, but also as a generic sensing-device, for example to control motors and/or to work with Processing, Max etc.
The detailed description of the project, together with schematics and source code, can be found here.

 

[Via: elektor.it]

Vibratron Robot Plays Out Midi As Steel Balls

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

As part of the National Robotics Week coverage of iheartrobotics, the Vibratron:

[...]the newest member of the RobOrchestra. This amazing musician was built by club members with a total budget of $1000. The Vibratron uses an Arduino Mega to control 30 individual solenoid gates which drop steel balls onto the vibration keys. Using the Arduino Mega they were able to avoid complications with multiplexing I/O lines. Notes are read in using a MIDI shield to receive standard MIDI signals from a sequencer or keyboard. The balls are recirculated using an Archimedes screw to raise them to the bucket at the top.

(more…)

Arduino Midi Rainbow

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

Last week I was in Rome for the Arduino Day. I was amazed by the projects and the people there: true Arduino fans. This is the first post about some of those projects: more soon.

[anbello] generates – via MIDI – different light patterns on a strip of addressable RGB LED

MIDI messages from the keyboard (real or simulated on PC) enter the MIDI Shield’s MIDI IN and are presented to the Arduino serial port. The Arduino firmware interprets the MIDI messages NoteOn NoteOff, associates each key on the five octaves (60 keys) keyboard to a strip LED and lights it with color associated with the note. In the firmware to control the strip we used the FastSPI_LED library that allows you to address every single LED and turn the desired color (R, G, B).
One interesting thing to note is the use of the firmaware function millis() to implement a sort of elementary multitasking. The idea was taken from this post after user “westfw” on the Arduino forum.

I really appreciate the effort of translating the post. Check the code and part list on [Sululab]

 

More Lufa Hacks: Keyboard, Mouse, and MIDI.

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

[Darran] played around LUFA firmwares on the Arduino UNO and Arduino 2560. It seems now LUFA hacking is getting more and more common among Arduino users.

I’ve published the source, hex files, and sample sketches for Keyboard HID, Mouse HID, and USB MIDI drivers for the UNO and Mega2560 on http://hunt.net.nz/users/darran.

The LUFA project has made this fairly easy to do which is great, the only drawback is the limitation of only 4KB of flash space for the driver in the atmega8u2.

via [hunt.net]

HIDUINO: Arduino talking MIDI

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Some time ago [ant.b]  from the Arduino Forum manage to reflash the Atmega8u with other LUFA Firmwares. [Dimitri Diakopoulos] has recently developed a similar approach for his HIDUINO project. Very good explanation & references.  Diakopoulos succeded to make Arduino show up as a MIDI Device:

LUFA powers the HIDUINO project in that it handles most of the low-level USB-HID implementation while exposing an API for developing other HID-compliant devices like MIDI.

The USB-HID specification has a specific type for MIDI input and MIDI output, which nearly all commercial musical controllers on the market use for class-compliant (driverless!) MIDI I/O.

Check out guide for ISP flashing, on the project page hosted on googleCode.

via [HackADay], source [HIDUINO]

 

SimplenZAR Gets More Complicated

Thursday, March 3rd, 2011

Arduino sending MIDI messages to control some other geeky machinery for electronic music, on breadboard.

Lately SimplenZAR becomes a self-made shield.

Late again an Arduino is developed just to fit that shield and set the original Arduino free to for the next project. Bravo!

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Accordion Playing Midi Under 100$

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

Amazing Accordion sending MIDI under 100$ (instead of 6,699.00$), as [Dmitry Yegorenkov] shares on Arduino Forum and published on GitHub.

I like to play accordion & have a dog. People say dogs are singing with squeezeboxes and some people find it funny. Not for me. I know that my pet hears note harmonics much better then me & suffers from high pitches very much. I could not really practice at home just because of humanennes. That sucks. I like to play accordion. Programmers see cycle here. Let’s get out.

THIS IS IT.
It plays to headphones, produces MIDI output, etc. etc. It costs $6,699.00 on e-bay (buy now offer) on November 17, 2010. In the US I can buy Peugeot Partner for the same price. In Ukraine where i live both are 1/2 times more expensive. For that money i’ll get beautiful device to practice at home and no service centers available within 400Km radius. Weird.

Code and Schematics-ready on [Accordion Mega's Github]

Arduino To Ableton Live Via Pure DataArduino To Ableton Live Via Pure DataArduino To Ableton Live Via Pure Data

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

 

[Spencer] built a controller sending serial data to Pure Data using Firmata Library. The data is processed and sent to Ableton Live via Midi:

It’s still unfinished here. It’s basically opening the communication between the arduino, scaling everything from 0-127 to be compatible with MIDI, then being routed through various CC’s to mac’s IAC driver, which passes the MIDI CC’s into Ableton Live.

So there you have it. A few things are missing, the LED’s still need to be added and tweaked, a problem with there not being enough power to illuminate the very demanding buttons, although I plan to resolve this with an external DC adapter though.

 

[Spencer] built a controller sending serial data to Pure Data using Firmata Library. The data is processed and sent to Ableton Live via Midi:

It’s still unfinished here. It’s basically opening the communication between the arduino, scaling everything from 0-127 to be compatible with MIDI, then being routed through various CC’s to mac’s IAC driver, which passes the MIDI CC’s into Ableton Live.

So there you have it. A few things are missing, the LED’s still need to be added and tweaked, a problem with there not being enough power to illuminate the very demanding buttons, although I plan to resolve this with an external DC adapter though.

[Spencer] built a controller sending serial data to Pure Data using Firmata Library. The data is processed and sent to Ableton Live via Midi:

It’s still unfinished here. It’s basically opening the communication between the arduino, scaling everything from 0-127 to be compatible with MIDI, then being routed through various CC’s to mac’s IAC driver, which passes the MIDI CC’s into Ableton Live.

So there you have it. A few things are missing, the LED’s still need to be added and tweaked, a problem with there not being enough power to illuminate the very demanding buttons, although I plan to resolve this with an external DC adapter though.

(more…)

Arduino and MIDI: AVbrain’s worklog

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010

 

Even if you can find many projects using Arduino and MIDI, not many of them are so well described as [zambari] project. The AVbrain controller was developed to stay on top of a complex AudioVisual Hardware scenario.

Found (and supported from day one) on [vjforums], The AVbrain feautures:

- Following MIDI clock
– Recording and playback of 40 note long MIDI sequence
– Sending custom strings of MIDI messages in sync with MIDI clock including:
– CC information to fade video on Edirol V4 (synced to PAL)
– CC information to fade output on Edirol V4 (synced to PAL)
– CC information to fade video layers on Korg Kaptivator (synced to PAL)
– NoteOn data to trigger light flashes via MIDI-DMX converter
– Triggering audio loops on Korg ESX1 so they could be longer than the pattern played on ESX
– Triggering AR and Filter envelopes on Sherman Filterbank
– OneKnob functionality extending Korg ESX1′s ability to only control one part at time. With AV-Brain you could learn a NRPN message, assign it to a knob and use independently of device’s state.
– Fade up or down relative volume of all the channels on ESX1 – Filtering MIDI messages
– All sequencer tracks can be synced to 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 or 32 beats
– All sequencer tracks can be re-synced manually and still follow the tempo (to compensate for video delay)

via [vjforums] source [EQ-AV]