Archive for the ‘music’ Category

Arduino-based theremin

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Theremin is one of the most exiting musical instruments ever made, mainly because of its “quite odd” playing method. Infact, its working principle is based on near-filed coupling between the hands of the theremin player and two metal antennas, used to determine the pitch of a variable-frequency oscillator and to adjust the volume of the output signal, respectively.
Several theremin implementation are possible, such as the “original” analog one (based on the mixing of two sine waves originated by a fixed-frequency oscillator and a variable-frequency one) and those based on digital techniques.
LabIII guys implemented a nice and simple Arduino theremin module, based on a TTL LC-type oscillator, usable not only to play electronic music, but also as a generic sensing-device, for example to control motors and/or to work with Processing, Max etc.
The detailed description of the project, together with schematics and source code, can be found here.

 

[Via: elektor.it]

Chess sequencer

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012

The musical interfaces can sometimes be extremely curious. That’s the case of  the chess sequencer.

 

 

The Chess Sequencer is a step matrix sequencer made from a chess board, where placing the pieces make music. The sequencer is connected to software synths on my Mac trough USB and a Processing patch to convert the serial data to internal midi.

The core here is an Arduino Mega. I was planing to use the Duemilanove but laziness caught me. The Mega has tons of IOs so I do not have to make a lot of multiplexing saving me hours of work.

Check here the full instructions to build your own!

 

 

Beatbearing using Arduino

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

This is an interesting project for an extreme geek and an amateur music maker. All you have to do, is to follow the tutorial here, and get a complete parts list.

Via[Jameco]

Electronic music from Jelly

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Ever fancied making your own musical instrument? Or better, cooking your own musical instrument? Two students in their final year at Les Ateliers French National Institute for Design created this amazing musical project using gelatin, called – Noisy Jelly. When the jelly is stroked, it produces sounds of different patterns.

Variations of shapes and salt concentration, plus the strength of finger contact, determine the audio signals that result. Once created, the jellies are placed on top of the game board, which is a capacitive sensor connected to an arduino that translates the interaction into sound.

The highlight of this piece of art is the visualization of electric signals in the form of theremin-like noises.

Via[Popsci]

Arduino Circuit Bending Workshop in Torino

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Il prossimo week-end a Torino si terrà un workshop gratuito di Arduino (un kit opzionale potrà essere comprato per partecipare qualora non disponeste dei materiali elencati) sul circuit bending e la generazione di suoni con la scheda.

Un workshop di tre giorni per smontare riciclare e far suonare vecchi strumenti elettronici, creare una digital toys orchesta e sfilare in parata a Paratissima.

Il circuit Bending è una pratica molto diffusa tra gli sperimentatori musicali. Soprattutto sulla scena della musica elettronica sono sempre più frequenti gli artisti che si creano controller o addirittura strumenti musicali personalizzati.

Nel workshop saranno coinvolte diverse discipline: toy hacking, riciclo elettronico, elettronica di base, sintesi sonora, programmazione ad oggetti e faremo largo uso di Arduino per comandare i nuovi strumenti.

Il workshop è gratuito, a carico dei partecipanti il costo dei materiali e l’acquisto del kit-workshop.
maggiori informazioni quì!

Per partecipare registrati qui.

via [FablabItalia]

Arduino, iPod and RFID make beautiful, handicapped-accessible music together

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

Terrence O’Bien posts a clean music interface (no menus / no buttons)  based on RFID, as previously seen some time ago.

There isn’t actually much new about this awesome DIY project, but it’s the way it brings the various parts together that has us impressed. Designed by Instructables user XenonJohn, with help from software developer David Findlay, the Magic Music Table RFID was designed to let a disable child (or other such handicapped user) select albums to play back from an iPod touch playlist. The iPod is connected to anArduino, which tells the device to start playing a particular track based on a selection made with RFIDcards. The whole setup is built into a coffee table and the RFID tags are sandwiched inside clear plastic blocks with the album art. You can see it in action in the video after the break and, if you’ve got the patience and skill, you can build your own using the directions at the source link.

via [Engadget] source [Instructables]


Listening To The Walls' Whispers

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

[Pierre] shares an interesting geo-localization project of sound, narration and  culture,  made in  “plan d’Aou”, a district of Marseilles – France. The project dates back in September 2010, within the framework of the Smala project in order to trace a sound cartography of Islam in the city of Marseilles: the guys at [Echelle Inconnue] took their time to fully document the all project with schematics, codes, fritzing diagrams and so on.

Several mobile systems were distributed to the people to accompany their walk across the district with, by hand, a kind of speaker to be press on the walls which makes it possible to listen to the sound by vibrating the material of the wall.

The materials of urban furniture or buildings become the speakers required for sound diffusion. Each resonant body had its acoustic specificities, the words take shape in metal, wood or glass… Textures of the sound fluctuate from a surface to another and the listener must juggle with these characteristics to obtain a quality of optimal listening, between documentary in the walls and poetic sound creation.

source [echelleinconnue]

Listening To The Walls’ Whispers

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

[Pierre] shares an interesting geo-localization project of sound, narration and  culture,  made in  “plan d’Aou”, a district of Marseilles – France. The project dates back in September 2010, within the framework of the Smala project in order to trace a sound cartography of Islam in the city of Marseilles: the guys at [Echelle Inconnue] took their time to fully document the all project with schematics, codes, fritzing diagrams and so on.

Several mobile systems were distributed to the people to accompany their walk across the district with, by hand, a kind of speaker to be press on the walls which makes it possible to listen to the sound by vibrating the material of the wall.

The materials of urban furniture or buildings become the speakers required for sound diffusion. Each resonant body had its acoustic specificities, the words take shape in metal, wood or glass… Textures of the sound fluctuate from a surface to another and the listener must juggle with these characteristics to obtain a quality of optimal listening, between documentary in the walls and poetic sound creation.

source [echelleinconnue]

Serenading with Arduino

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

This is for the uber-cool geeks who want to specially set up a pre-dinner concert for their loved ones.

Using an SRF05 and an Arduino Uno get that beautiful musical effect with the perfect smile!

Also get the code from Github, plug it in, load the sketch and play!

via [Michele] and [Larry]

DIY Fabric Speakers

Sunday, February 27th, 2011

Interesting DIY fabric speakers from Hannah Perner-Wilson:

Making a speaker is much easier than you’ve ever imagined, and what you need to prepare is merely: textile (or paper), conductive tape and some strong magnets. Try this one made by Hannah Perner-Wilson and you’ll find it quite impressive.

UPDATE: as Tara commented below, you can have more information about Hannah’s work on her website Kobakant.at

via [innewidea]

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