Archive for the ‘MIDI’ Category

A "Draw it yourself" midi controller with a 3d-printed case

Friday, September 26th, 2014

dani-draw01

‘Draw It Yourself’ is a MIDI controller created by Dani Sanz which uses conductive ink as push-buttons. It is based on Arduino Uno and uses a capacitive sensor to determine whether the drawn buttons are being touched or not: (more…)

Real life Lego Rock Band powered by Arduino

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

legoband

We’d like to share the performance, by Opificio Sonico,  recorded live in July 2014 of  Toa Mata Band, best known as the “World’s first LEGO robotic band” and controlled by Arduino Uno which is hooked up to a MIDI sequencer: (more…)

DIY russian folk bot playing from EEG

Friday, June 6th, 2014

portable electro-acoustic orchestra

“Turbo-gusli” or “Gusli-samogudy” is a russian folk bot made by Moscow media-artist, musician and engineer of strange-sounding mechanisms – Dmitry Morozov. It’s basically a portable electro-acoustic orchestra inspired by “Gusli-samogudy”, a self-playing gusli, the oldest Russian multi-string plucked instrument, and very common in old russian fairy tales.

The system works in 3 different modes: when it plays algorithmically from Pure Data patch, when it’s controlled by Emotiv EPOC EEG interface and in MIDI mode (all of them using Pduino library and custom patch in Pure Data). (more…)

Delicate tumbles and robotic panels meet dance music with Arduino

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

tantra

Creative Applications featured Timo Maas video showing a custom MIDI-controlled machine built by a creative team  including Daito Manabe:

‘Tantra’ is the new single from Timo Maas, taken from his latest artist album, ‘Lifer’. The video for the single, created by Daito Manabe, Motoi Ishibashi, Muryo Homma and Youichi Sakamoto (rhizomatiks) includes a machine that uses Arduino controlled ball dispensers, motorised rotating steel plates and LED lights to create a nexus between electronic music and a sound responsive mechanical object.

 

A Physical Music Sequencer using RFID tags

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

A Physical Music Sequencer

Mike Cook prototyped  a diy physical music sequencer  with an Arduino Uno and we agree with him it has a “unique take on the concept an RFID sequencer”.

He wrote us describing it with these words:

This takes RFID tags each one mapped to a note and instrument and placed on one of 32 pegs will generate a music sequence. I designed and built a special RFID reader that has 32 read positions, it took 3 months to wire up. The case was hand built and it was designed to fit exactly into a flight box. It contains an Arduino and outputs MIDI.

It uses 32 red / blue LEDs to illuminate acrylic pegs which light up red when a token is hung on them. The sequence sweep progress is shown in blue on the pegs when the sweep position meets a peg with a token it light up purple and a note is produced. The sequence length can be adjusted from 8 steps to over a million steps before repeating.

(more…)

Build your own drum pad

Monday, September 17th, 2012

With the Drum kit – Kit AI by Spikenzielabs you can build an electronic drum kit. The bundle contains all of the electronics, including the piezo sensors for the drum pads. You build the drum pads yourself, and then connect the Drum Kit – Kit AI to your computer to play sounds using your favorite audio software, or use the MIDI-out port to a connected drum synthesizer.

Roberto De Nicolò (aka Rodenic) has realized an useful tutorial video showing what he has called FingerDrum. Roberto has applied a piezo sensor to each finger of a glove, allowing the triggering of individual drum sounds from his midi expander. If you think the glove is unconfortable, check out the FingerPad and turn your mouse pad into a drum pad.

 

 

 

Serenading with Arduino

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

This is for the uber-cool geeks who want to specially set up a pre-dinner concert for their loved ones.

Using an SRF05 and an Arduino Uno get that beautiful musical effect with the perfect smile!

Also get the code from Github, plug it in, load the sketch and play!

via [Michele] and [Larry]

Vibratron Robot Plays Out Midi As Steel Balls

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

As part of the National Robotics Week coverage of iheartrobotics, the Vibratron:

[...]the newest member of the RobOrchestra. This amazing musician was built by club members with a total budget of $1000. The Vibratron uses an Arduino Mega to control 30 individual solenoid gates which drop steel balls onto the vibration keys. Using the Arduino Mega they were able to avoid complications with multiplexing I/O lines. Notes are read in using a MIDI shield to receive standard MIDI signals from a sequencer or keyboard. The balls are recirculated using an Archimedes screw to raise them to the bucket at the top.

(more…)

HIDUINO: Arduino talking MIDI

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Some time ago [ant.b]  from the Arduino Forum manage to reflash the Atmega8u with other LUFA Firmwares. [Dimitri Diakopoulos] has recently developed a similar approach for his HIDUINO project. Very good explanation & references.  Diakopoulos succeded to make Arduino show up as a MIDI Device:

LUFA powers the HIDUINO project in that it handles most of the low-level USB-HID implementation while exposing an API for developing other HID-compliant devices like MIDI.

The USB-HID specification has a specific type for MIDI input and MIDI output, which nearly all commercial musical controllers on the market use for class-compliant (driverless!) MIDI I/O.

Check out guide for ISP flashing, on the project page hosted on googleCode.

via [HackADay], source [HIDUINO]

 

SimplenZAR Gets More Complicated

Thursday, March 3rd, 2011

Arduino sending MIDI messages to control some other geeky machinery for electronic music, on breadboard.

Lately SimplenZAR becomes a self-made shield.

Late again an Arduino is developed just to fit that shield and set the original Arduino free to for the next project. Bravo!

(more…)

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