Archive for the ‘TVOut’ Category

Arduino-Driven Content-Sensitive TV Mute

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Matt Richardson has a great blog post on Make about using an Arduino to read the closed-captioning stream from a TV using a video experimenters shield, then muting the TV whenever the name of an annoying celebrity is heard. Besides being a great idea, it’s a nicely made explanatory video.  Nice work, Matt!

 

Matt Richardson's TV muter project. Image from makezine.com

 

 

Arduino Computer Vision With Video Experimenter Shield

Thursday, March 24th, 2011

[Michael] posted some interesting uses of Nootropic’s latest shield, the Video Experimenter Shield, besed on a LM1881 video sync separator to detect the timing of the vertical and horizontal sync in a composite video signal. It’s one of the few examples of Arduino processing a live video signal, as previously seen with the Eye Shield (based on the same IC, but with no video out implemented). The image here is processed and sent out from the Arduino using a custom version of the TVoutLibrary. Wow.

The Video Experimenter shield can give your Arduino the gift of sight. In the Video Frame Capture project, I showed how to capture images from a composite video source and display them on a TV. We can take this concept further by processing the contents of the captured image to implement object tracking and edge detection.

The setup is the same as when capturing video frames: a video source like a camera is connected to the video input. The output select switch is set to “overlay”, and sync select jumper set to “video input”. Set the analog threshold potentiometer to the lowest setting.

Please have a look at the other examples, such as edge detection, and using the shield to Decoding Captioning Data inside the signal.

via [nootropicDesign], also [Video Experimenter Project Page]

Nunchuck Controlled 3D Cube On TV

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

[Paul]  took the TVout library, the Wiichuck library and wrote it’s own 3D library. In this way he’s got a nunchuck controlled 3D shape on TV

Movement in the nunchuck is detected by the arduino, then the cube is redrawn according to new angle of the controller. 3d wireframe library header and source. Code to tie everything together

via [Paulsarduino]

Arduino Realtime Audio Spectrum Analyzer with Video out! Arduino Realtime Audio Spectrum Analyzer with Video out! Arduino Realtime Audio Spectrum Analyzer with Video out!

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

[Paul Bishop] shared code & pics about his project mixing a 8 bit FFT library found on the forum (in C) and the TvOut library.
The first piece- data collection- is fairly standard.  I use an electret microphone (which alone only produces a few mV output, far too low for our Arduino to use directly) with a transistor amplifier as the signal source, which is then sampled via the ADC on the Analog 0 pin of the Arduino.
To do spectrum analysis however, you need to capture signal over time, then process that data with what is known as a Fourier Transformation.  This magical process takes a signal and breaks it down into buckets  based upon frequencies found within the sample.  This produces a remarkably good picture of the signal.. and if displayed, functions as a visual spectrum analyzer if looped over and over.
This post contains a library which performs both the sampling and the Fast Fourier Transformation completely in C in 8 bits, amazing fast considering that fact, and uses a few tricks to be really stingy on memory, which is at a premium on Arduino- especially with the TVout data space eating up quite a bit.  Since the Atmega 328 only has 2k of RAM, every byte counts.  Matrix math done like this is nothing short of awesome.  Best of all, it’s usable as a library.  Cut and paste the .cpp and .h into a new folder named “FFT” in the Libraries directory.  My Arduino project code is adapted from the original code from the forum-posted Arduino program.
via [Blurtime]

 

[Paul Bishop] shared code & pics about his project mixing a 8 bit FFT library found on the forum (in C) and the TvOut library.
The first piece- data collection- is fairly standard. I use an electret microphone (which alone only produces a few mV output, far too low for our Arduino to use directly) with a transistor amplifier as the signal source, which is then sampled via the ADC on the Analog 0 pin of the Arduino.
To do spectrum analysis however, you need to capture signal over time, then process that data with what is known as a Fourier Transformation. This magical process takes a signal and breaks it down into buckets based upon frequencies found within the sample. This produces a remarkably good picture of the signal.. and if displayed, functions as a visual spectrum analyzer if looped over and over.
This post contains a library which performs both the sampling and the Fast Fourier Transformation completely in C in 8 bits, amazing fast considering that fact, and uses a few tricks to be really stingy on memory, which is at a premium on Arduino- especially with the TVout data space eating up quite a bit. Since the Atmega 328 only has 2k of RAM, every byte counts. Matrix math done like this is nothing short of awesome. Best of all, it’s usable as a library. Cut and paste the .cpp and .h into a new folder named “FFT” in the Libraries directory. My Arduino project code is adapted from the original code from the forum-posted Arduino program.
via [Blurtime]

[Paul Bishop] shared code & pics about his project mixing a 8 bit FFT library found on the forum (in C) and the TvOut library.
The first piece- data collection- is fairly standard. I use an electret microphone (which alone only produces a few mV output, far too low for our Arduino to use directly) with a transistor amplifier as the signal source, which is then sampled via the ADC on the Analog 0 pin of the Arduino.
To do spectrum analysis however, you need to capture signal over time, then process that data with what is known as a Fourier Transformation. This magical process takes a signal and breaks it down into buckets based upon frequencies found within the sample. This produces a remarkably good picture of the signal.. and if displayed, functions as a visual spectrum analyzer if looped over and over.
This post contains a library which performs both the sampling and the Fast Fourier Transformation completely in C in 8 bits, amazing fast considering that fact, and uses a few tricks to be really stingy on memory, which is at a premium on Arduino- especially with the TVout data space eating up quite a bit. Since the Atmega 328 only has 2k of RAM, every byte counts. Matrix math done like this is nothing short of awesome. Best of all, it’s usable as a library. Cut and paste the .cpp and .h into a new folder named “FFT” in the Libraries directory. My Arduino project code is adapted from the original code from the forum-posted Arduino program.
via [Blurtime]