Archive for the ‘Libraries’ Category

Android Open 2011: Massimo Banzi, “Arduino & Android, Infinite Possibilities”

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

Nice Video of Massimo‘s talk at Android Open 2011.

via [O'Reilly Media]

Control a Slot Car Race With Your Mind

Friday, October 7th, 2011

[Riccardo Giraldi] posted a nice project controlling a slot car race from a Mindwave headset (=> your brain waves).

From B-Reel’s secret laboratory comes a brain-bending experimental project utilising a number of cutting edge tech tools. B-Reel’s UK creative director Riccardo Giraldi led the development of the project, and you can view the explanatory video here, as well as some of the creative musings in a write up below. [...] There are few commercial devices that claim to safely read your brain signals. We ended up choosing the Mindwave headset from Neurosky for this experiment because of its unobtrusive design and its affordable price.

via [TheNextWeb] source [B-Reel]

Arduino Libraries Census and Repository

Monday, September 26th, 2011

As we are approaching to the first official Arduino 1.0, we thought we could take some time to understand better the different libraries for Arduino out there including the state of compatibility with 1.0.

Massimo on the [Forum]:

At the moment , finding a library for Arduino is quite complex for a user (especially for beginners) because there is no official registry of libraries and some these libraries are abandoned although they might still be useful with some maintenance.

As part of the current effort to open up as many parts of the Arduino process as possibile we have thought about how to improve the situation and here are some actions undertaken right now:

1. we are working on a database of every Arduino library available. This will be published on our website as soon as it’s done. In the meantime library authors can help us by entering their library in the “database” through this link

http://bit.ly/ArduinoLibrarySurvey

Please add your library specifying all the required info so that we can contact you in case we need more info.
The only requirement is that the library must run on at least one of the boards listed in the Arduino IDE.

2. We have created a new repository for Arduino Libraries on github available here: https://github.com/arduino-libraries
we encourage every library author to migrate their code there (especially if they are not using a sourcecode repository) . We’ll create projects for each library managed by the original library author. This will allow each library to have a documentation page and an issue management page.
In the future we expect this repository to be part of a system that will make it very easy for the users to select and install libraries directly from the ide being warned of any update available for the ones they currently have installed.

It’s a bit of a large project in a way but in the long run it will create a nice repository of very useful code.

I hope you will join this exciting project!!!

As usual comments and suggestions are welcome.

Listening To The Walls’ Whispers

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

[Pierre] shares an interesting geo-localization project of sound, narration and  culture,  made in  “plan d’Aou”, a district of Marseilles – France. The project dates back in September 2010, within the framework of the Smala project in order to trace a sound cartography of Islam in the city of Marseilles: the guys at [Echelle Inconnue] took their time to fully document the all project with schematics, codes, fritzing diagrams and so on.

Several mobile systems were distributed to the people to accompany their walk across the district with, by hand, a kind of speaker to be press on the walls which makes it possible to listen to the sound by vibrating the material of the wall.

The materials of urban furniture or buildings become the speakers required for sound diffusion. Each resonant body had its acoustic specificities, the words take shape in metal, wood or glass… Textures of the sound fluctuate from a surface to another and the listener must juggle with these characteristics to obtain a quality of optimal listening, between documentary in the walls and poetic sound creation.

source [echelleinconnue]

Der Kritzler, An Automatic Scribbling Machine

Monday, September 5th, 2011

[Alex Weber] put together a motorized drawing machine painting 2d Vector Graphics on his office’s glasses.

An automatic scribbling machine sounds less than useful, admittedly, but it’s really just the style of line created by this motorized drawing machine. It’s reminiscent of ASCII art, in which heavier characters are used to create darker tones; in this case, the more jiggle added to the drawing platform, the more ink is put on the drawing surface. It’s kind of mesmerizing.

via [techCrunch] source & assembly [tinkerLog]

Displaying on Paper – Thermal Printer + Arduino

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

Guys at [bildr] wrote a nice tutorial on how to control & use a thermal printer with Arduino.

Outputting data can be extremely useful, and typically when we look at doing this, it is either to the Arduino’s serial terminal, or to some sort of display. But what about making physical copies of the data? (…) If you dont know about thermal printers, they are most often the printers your store’s receipts are printed on. The reason for this is that they dont use ink, or use a cartridge of any sort. The paper it prints on turns black when heated. So this printer simply applies heat where another printer would apply ink.

via [bildr]

Arduino-Driven Content-Sensitive TV Mute

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Matt Richardson has a great blog post on Make about using an Arduino to read the closed-captioning stream from a TV using a video experimenters shield, then muting the TV whenever the name of an annoying celebrity is heard. Besides being a great idea, it’s a nicely made explanatory video.  Nice work, Matt!

 

Matt Richardson's TV muter project. Image from makezine.com

 

 

Arduino Powered 2.4 GHz Spectrum Analyzer Lets You

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

Arduino forum user [Blibo] shares its 2.4 Ghz spectrum analyzer project on the forum. The project is based on the CYWM6935 board (wireless), an Atmega 328 and a Nokia 5110 LCD-

I finished the (mostly) permanent version of my 2.4ghz spectrum analyzer, and soldered it up. I included 3 modes for scanning (fast, slow, and ghost – like the long exposure on a camera), plus a function to display the voltage on an analog pin, and graph it (for when the oscilloscope’s not cooperating). These modes are toggled through by hitting the big push button [...] I have already used it to help setup my wireless network, (channel, location, things that cause interference), and it is always interesting to see what uses the 2.4ghz spectrum. So far, the things that I’ve noticed on the spectrum while walking around with the analyzer are: 
-microwave ovens (huge disturbance in the middle of the spectrum)
-Wifi 
-Cordless phones
-Bluetooth
-Wireless keyboard
-Wireless speakers
The fast mode is ok for seeing EMI, but for digital signals, the slow mode is best. The ghost mode also gives a general idea of spectrum use over a period of time.

via [HackADay] source(code) on [Arduino Forum]

August Specials: Tinkerkit Servos And Open SoftWear

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

We are happy to announce 3 new products available at the Arduino Store: two powerful servos with the standard Tinkerkit 3pin connector (T010050 and T010051) and OpenSoftwear, a book about fashion and technology by Tony Olsson, David Gaetano, Jonas Odhner, Samson Wiklund, in it’s second, revised edition.

IAAC’s CAN-Based Interactive Architectures

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Barcelona-based IAAC school is hosting a summer school (in Barcelona and Mumbay). The theme of this year’s course is creating an urban tool of a networked city based on a new informational layer.

What happens if we think Urbanism and Energy through a new informational layer added in our cities?

(more…)