Archive for the ‘Android’ Category

Introducing Squirt, The Water Gun RobotIntroducing Squirt, The Water Gun RobotIntroducing Squirt, The Water Gun Robot

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

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Introducing Squirt, The Water Gun RobotIntroducing Squirt, The Water Gun RobotIntroducing Squirt, The Water Gun Robot

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

(more…)

Flash / Arduino Based Speed DetectorFlash / Arduino Based Speed DetectorFlash / Arduino Based Speed Detector

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

 

Flash / Arduino Based Speed Detector from Mike Chambers on Vimeo.

[Mike Chambers] developed a nice Flash / Arduino based speed detector with clients for Mac, Windows and Android based devices (via Adobe AIR 2.5 beta).

Here is how it works. I have an Arduino Duemilanove with ATMega328 which has two photo-resistors connected (with a 10k pull down resistor). I set up two laser pointers to shine a laser directly onto the photo-resistor (which is enclosed within a dark box). The Arduino monitors the values returned from the light sensor, and watches for any changes that indicate that the laser bean has been broken. When both laser beams are broken, the Arduino calculates the amount of time between when each sensor was tripped. It then sends that value to the Adobe AIR based client, which is connected to the Arduino via USB / Serial port and a serial port proxy (in the case, TinkerProxy).

You can get the schematics and the codes from this project on Mike’s github.

via [MikeChambers]

 

Flash / Arduino Based Speed DetectorFlash / Arduino Based Speed DetectorFlash / Arduino Based Speed Detector

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

 

Flash / Arduino Based Speed Detector from Mike Chambers on Vimeo.

[Mike Chambers] developed a nice Flash / Arduino based speed detector with clients for Mac, Windows and Android based devices (via Adobe AIR 2.5 beta).

Here is how it works. I have an Arduino Duemilanove with ATMega328 which has two photo-resistors connected (with a 10k pull down resistor). I set up two laser pointers to shine a laser directly onto the photo-resistor (which is enclosed within a dark box). The Arduino monitors the values returned from the light sensor, and watches for any changes that indicate that the laser bean has been broken. When both laser beams are broken, the Arduino calculates the amount of time between when each sensor was tripped. It then sends that value to the Adobe AIR based client, which is connected to the Arduino via USB / Serial port and a serial port proxy (in the case, TinkerProxy).

You can get the schematics and the codes from this project on Mike’s github.

via [MikeChambers]

 

Mobile Home Automation Via Android

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

I created this project and my target is improve the comfort of my home. Taking a look around I noticed that home automation solution proposed by the big market player are too much expensive for me and, above all, I should create new wires connections between light, plug, etc.. and the control box.
My idea is use what we already have without spend lot of money to buy a owner solution, so I started with arduino, my android mobile phone, some relays and my home.
I have a nice home, 2 bad rooms, kitchen with living room and it was very nice tka e the control of the lights, gate and door with my mobile phone.

[Mattia] have realized home automation via internet, using:

[...] an Arduino 2009 with ethernet shield and the game is very easy, I send some http message to arduino, he moves some relays and give me back a JSON response. Not so hard, but the hard business is interfacing with the electrical wiring of home, with some patience I found what I need and I linked those wires at the relays.

A chi non è mai capitato di restare chiuso fuori casa senza le chiavi? Beh a noi spesso e ci sarebbe piaciuto aprire il nostro cancello o porta di ingresso usando il telefono cellulare che abbiamo sempre con noi, il bisogno aguzza l’ingegno…ed ecco fatto! Ci siamo guardati un attimo in giro ed abbiamo recuperato un po’ di informazioni su Arduino, la sua filosofia a “brick” ci è sembrata l’ideale per fare quello che avevamo in mente, il mio HTC Hero con Android OS ha fatto il resto.

[Mattia] ha realizzato un progetto di automazione domestica usando Arduino Duemilanove e Ethernet Shield:

[...]Bisogna far comunicare Arduino con il nostro telefono, la soluzione più pulita che mi è balzata in mente era quella di usare il protoccolo http per farsì che la comunicazione avvenga  e JSON per scambiarsi i dati agilemente.

Più informazioni sul sito [nerdyDog]

via [ArduinoForum] source [nerdyDog]

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Android using NES controller from Android and Bluesmirf (Bluetooth)

Monday, September 13th, 2010

 

 

In this video [sketchsk3tch] youtube user plays Super Mario on a HTC EVO, using a NES controller.

This is a project I did using an Arduino and a Bluesmirf bluetooth module so I could control my NES emulator on my EVO with an NES controller.

more info after the break

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Amarino 2.0 toolkit is out!

Friday, June 11th, 2010

as Make says, Amarino turned to the next (2.0) stage. This news is a challenge to all of us to new, immersive, android-mobile-oriented scenarios. any iPhone answers?

Many new features in Amarino 2.0

  • control multiple bluetooth devices in parallel
  • visual feedback for events sent from the phone
  • plug-in concept to integrate your own events with Amarino (and using its visualizer for feedback)
  • support for Android 1.x and 2.x devices
  • introduces a Android library to talk to Amarino from your own app
  • much clearer code

source [Amarino official site]

Android-powered Garduino remote control

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

Dan Morrill decided to take the Garduino system that he built a step further, and created a remote control that runs on an Android phone and talks to the Arduino over Bluetooth.

Via [MAKE]

Android Phone Grows Up, Becomes Brain for Real Robot Read More

Monday, March 8th, 2010

wow. Android G1 Driven Bot!

Playing with apps on an Android phone is fun. Building your own apps, even more so. But what about using the phone to operate a moving, talking bot? Tim Heath and Ryan Hickman have done exactly that. [...]

They could have purchased the pricey $175 Oomlout kit, which includes wheels, motors and an Arduino-based brain. Hickman and Heath opted for making their own chassis. Here’s a full list of parts they used:

  • $16 Bare bones Arduino
  • $3 Micro servo
  • $0.25 Hex inverter (handled 3.3v to 5v conversion)
  • $4 HTC USB breakout board
  • $4 miscellaneous cardboard, strap ties, wires, rear wheel
  • $3 Mini breadboard

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Android G1 serial to Arduino

Friday, January 29th, 2010

Nice Instructable to get your G1 talking Serial to Arduino.
via [hackaday]

UPDATE:  check this Amarino project kit concisting in an Android App + a Arduino library to get you ready listening to the physical word.

via [DIYDrones]