Archive for the ‘keyboard’ Category

Hack! USB NeXT Keyboard with an Arduino Micro #ArduinoMicroMonday

Monday, March 10th, 2014

opened

On Adafruit Learning System there are a lot of cool tutorials and this  particular one is based on the Arduino Micro used to upcycles old Next keyboards:

Ladyada and pt had an old NeXT keyboard with a strong desire to get it running on a modern computer. These keyboards are durable, super clicky, and very satisfying to use! However, they are very old designs, specifically made for NeXT hardware, pre-ADB and pre-USB! That means you can’t just plug the keyboard into an ADB or PS/2 port or PS/2 to USB converter (even though it looks similar). In fact, I have no idea what the protocol or pinout is named, so we’ll just call it “non-ADB NeXT Keyboard”

Click and follow the steps to make your own.

 

SpamPoetry (or how to recycle spam)

Friday, May 18th, 2012

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Everyday, a lot of spam inevitably arrives to our mailboxes, forcing us to lose time in discerning fake emails from good ones, so everyone agrees on saying that spam is frustrating and completely useless.

This is almost true, since Varvara Guljajeva and Mar Canet Sola have taken advantage of spam coming from the Internet (more specifically, those messages “donated” by Eindhoven people) to make a very creative art project: first, they have recycled spam to algoritmically create poetry and, then, they have sent the result to a properly Arduino-hacked knitting machine (Arduino has been used to emulate the typing of the commands required to load the pattern).

From the authors:

Concerning the concept, we are interested in bringing together digital culture and traditional handicraft. To be more specific, the idea is to experiment with the form and meaning of SPAM. We turn SPAM into a romantic, funny or even sarcastic poetry and present it in unusual tangible form as knitted garment. To be more specific, we call final result dysfunctional wearable, because it reminds a sweater but is not really a one. Like SPAM, our dysfunctional wearable does not have a purpose.

The result is really impressive and it has been presented at two exhibitions, at Eindhoven and Malmö. Several pictures of the events can be found here. More information about the project can be found at Mar and Varvara‘s homepages.

[Via: Mar's Homepage and Varvara's Homepage]

Alarma DIY con Módulo 3G, Cámara, Ultrasonidos, Teclado Matricial & Led RGB

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

Arduteka lanza su último tutorial!

En él nos descubre el nuevo módulo 3G para Arduino de Cooking Hacks con el que podremos construir una divertida alarma que nos enviará la foto de nuestro intruso directamente a nuestro correo, además de avisarnos por un mensaje sms a nuestro teléfono móvil sin necesidad de tener conectado nuestro Arduino a internet constantemente, pues lo hace todo a través de la red móvil.

Vamos a construirnos una alarma totalmente casera, a través del sensor de ultrasonidos, escanearemos continuamente el espacio situado enfrente suyo con un radio aproximado de 30º, cuando algún objeto o persona se sitúe en su campo de actuación a una distancia inferior a la que establezcamos, haremos sonar una alarma, tomaremos una fotografía, el Led RGB que antes estaba verde, pasará a color azul y daremos 10 segundos para poder desactivar la alarma a través de nuestro teclado matricial, si la desactivamos, volverá de nuevo a escanear el campo, pero si no!! Reproducirá un sonido contundente y se dispondrá a mandarnos un sms a nuestro teléfono móvil y la fotografía a nuestro correo electrónico.

Via:[Arduteka]

 

Minor Project – Keyboard input, Matrix Display Output

Monday, May 17th, 2010

[Adam] shared with us a nice keyboard-to-matrix project.

Check out for the (long) code after the break.

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Tutorial: Reading a 12-Button Keypad

Thursday, April 8th, 2010

Nice nifty tutorial (difficulty level = 1) on hooking up a 12 button keypad on your Arduino.

Most keypads like this are wired so it makes it straightforward to figure out what button is being pressed. With 3 columns and 4 rows of buttons, you only need 7 wires. Typically all the buttons in a column are connected together with the same wire, and all the buttons in a row are connected together with the same wire. To determine which button is pressed, you apply a voltage to the wire attached to a column and then check the wires attached to each row to see if current is flowing through any of them. If so, then the switch for a particular button is closed (button pressed). Then you proceed to the next column and try each row again, etc. Not rocket science — just scanning a bunch of switches to see which one is closed. In fact, there is a keypad library in the Arduino Playground that makes it easy to do this.

[Michael] from nootropicdesign.com is using a 10 wires non-standard keyboard. Check-out his code.

Via [nootropicdesign]

Arduino + Laptop Touchpad

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

Yeah. It is what it seems to. Here’s the code & tutorial to hack a laptop touchpad and use it with arduino.
Clear nice pictures, thought.

thanks for the link to [electoday] user M150. the full thread at [allthemods.com] from japala user.

Connecting a PS2 Keyboard to an Arduino

Friday, January 29th, 2010

Andreas form Malta shows us how to connect and use Arduino with a standard PS2 Keyboard, a nice step by step instructable-style post.

After some soldering he basically uses PS2Keyboard library overwrote with PS2KeyboardExt2. Nice.