Archive for the ‘Image(s)’ Category

Vertical Plotter Prototype

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Nice Grasshopper-to-Arduino plotter hack from FablabTorino maker Pietro Leoni, a collabotator at Carlo Ratti Associati studio in Turin. We’d love to see code & sketches online soon, as much as a second edition of the plotter.

 

Space experiments for everyone: the ArduSat project

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

ArduSat, which stands for “Arduino satellite”, is a recently kickstarted project that aims at developing an open platform usable to emulate space scientists:

Once launched, the ArduSat will be the first open platform allowing the general public to design and run their own space-based applications, games and experiments, steer the onboard cameras to take pictures on-demand, and even broadcast personalized messages back to Earth.

ArduSat will be equipped with several sensors (such as cameras, gyros, accelerometers, GPS and more) packed inside a small cube (the side will be approximately 10 cm long) that can be accessed through a set of Arduinos.

Once in orbit, the ArduSat will be accessible from the ground to flash the required firmware for the experiments and for getting back all the collected information. People interested in performing space experiments will have access to a ground replica of ArduSat explotable to test and debug their code before the actual deployment.

The project is very ambitious, and it is expected that such an open accessible space platform will have a considerable impact on how simple space experiments will be carried out in the forthcoming years, in the case of fundraising success.

You may find the Kickstarter page of the project here.

[Via: Hack A Day and Kickstarter]

MiniCom: an LCD-equipped remote shutter

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Pixel_k needed a simple remote shutter for his digital reflex camera, which had to be usable even in low-light situations, so he decided to build his own controller by exploiting an Arduino Pro Mini and a small LCD. The result is “MiniCom”:

The interface is limited to a single rotary knob you can push to validate your choices. It remains easy and intuitive to use even when it’s minus 20°C and it’s pitch black.
The output is a standard 3.5mm stereo jack, you can use different cables to control different brand of DSLRs.

Source code and a detailed description of the project can be found here.

[Via: Hack A Day and Knackes News]

Indoor air quality mapping

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

PLOTS guys propose an interesting way to measure the quality of the air for indoor environments, by hacking a second-hand Roomba robot (an autonomous vacuum cleaner).

These robots are programmed to randomly move inside rooms to clean up the floor, so by adding a simple air quality sensor on top of one of them, it is possible to easily implement a sort of “random walker” that will sense for us the presence of gases (volatile organic chemicals, VOCs), such as NH3, alcohol, CO2 and so forth.

To keep track of the air quality measurements, the authors equipped the so hacked Roomba with an RGB led, whose color can be changed according to the air sample. By taking a long exposure picture of the room where the robot was roaming in, they could determine the areas where a high concentration of VOCs was present.

The complete description of the project can be found on the PLOTS’ website, while here you may find a short video about it:

PLOTS guys are also working on a different approach to air sensing, which does not make use of a Roomba robot but uses a hamster ball, instead. Further details can be found here.

[Via: Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science]

Dial-click-photo-share!

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

The next time you wish to take a random photoshoot with one of these phones, do make a note that they are Arduino powered! The makers Chris Bell, Liangjie Xia, and Mike Kelberman built the Rotobooth as part of Twilio’s Photohack Day 2 event designed to showcase Twilio’s cloud computing capabilities.

When users lift the handset and dial their digits, an Arduino (you just knew there’d be one involved didn’t you?) takes in the information and then initiates the camera.

Four photos are taken — just like a photo booth — and they are sent to a Mac Mini. The photos are resized, watermarked and uploaded to Flickr. The photo links are then texted to your phone using Twilio.

If you decide not to enter your number just dial “0” and one photo is taken and is uploaded to Rotobooth.com

Now just dial your number on the Rotobooth’s rotary dial and once your photo is taken, the shot is uploaded to Flickr and you are texted with the link.

Via:[Dvice]

Cheap Arduino-based Thermal Flashlight

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Thermal flashlight is a widely used technique to “paint temperature with light”: by using a temperature sensor and a RGB flashlight, it is possible to illuminate a surface with a proper tonality, which, in turn, can be acquired by means of a standard camera. It’s main use is to find thermal leaks in houses and buildings.

In their article, PLOTS‘ staff propose and describe a nice and cheap way to build your own thermal flashlight with Arduino, together with a clear introduction to the subject.

Read more here.

Via: The Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science

 

High-tech blanket-cum-3D modelling tool

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

3D image input is often a challenging task when it comes to irregular objects like a human body. Here is where an arduino, tilt sensors and a little math comes to the rescue. University of Toronto’s Responsive Architecture at Daniels school created one such blanket.

The petals are made up of a conductive material, which are linked to larger network of conductive threads all in the shape of a hexagon. The loads of tilt sensors send the data of their position with respect to a central Arduino-powered computer which is then able to calculate the slopes between the various flowers and petals on the blanket. Thereby giving out a 3D input to the computer.

The concept will be widely applicable to interaction design, video game controls and numerous other fields.

Via:[Gizmodo, University of toronto - RAD]

Measuring battery capacity with an arduino

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

A yet another reason to have arduino in your basic-electronic toolkit. You can build your own battery capacity measuring device. Now compare all the brands of the so claimed ‘long lasting batteries’. Know what you are buying!

Follow the instructions to build from here. and get building!

Via: [Instructables]

Old style tweet printing machine

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

The Twittertape Machine prototype from Adam Vaughan connects to his Twitter account via Ethernet, checks for updates twice every minute, and prints out a hard copy of any new Tweets without the need for printer ink.

Vaughan told us that the idea for the Twittertape Machine was born of a desire to have the kind of old stock ticker seen in movies sitting on his desk. After a lukewarm reception to his pitch from friends, he decided to make his dream a reality. Rather than sacrifice a rare original (like the Edison Universal Stock Ticker used for Ames Bielenberg’s Spring Break project), he opted to build his own replica version from some old brass clock movements, a wooden plinth and a glass dome found online.

It is powered by two AC adapters and is controlled by a network-enabled Arduino-style microcontroller running custom code in the base. The board checks Vaughan’s Twitter account every 30 seconds for new Tweets.

The little thermal printer hidden at the base prints the tweets on a cut-down thermal paper. An awesome product in an awesome demand!

[Via: Twittertape and Gizmag]

Control An LCD with a 595 Shift Register

Monday, January 16th, 2012

[Carlo Denaro] is sharing a smart solution to save digital pins while controlling an LCD, using Shift Register 74HC595. A simple yet useful project with skecth&libraries, datasheets and Fritzing schematics.

via [grayhats.org]

Please enter a valid email to subscribe

Confirm your email address

We need to confirm your email address.
To complete the subscription, please click the link in the email we just sent you.

Thank you for subscribing!

Arduino
via Egeo 16
Torino, 10131
Italy