Archive for the ‘RTC’ Category

Data-logging made simple with Arduino

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

One of the best capabilities provided by Arduino regards its very high modularity, which helps users to quickly translate ideas into physical artifact, as practically demonstrated by Mauro, which shows on his blog how to build a simple data-logger by properly combining different shields. By using few additional components (mainly resistors and buttons) a fully-functional data logger can be easily implemented.

More information can be found here.

[Via: Mauro Alfieri's blog]

TicTocTrac: track your perception of time

Monday, May 14th, 2012

TicTocTrac Wristwatch

Brian Schiffer and Sima Mitra, from Cornell University, propose a very nice wristwatch that allows you to keep track of your time perception, using a method known as duration production: TicTocTrac.

Human perception of time is typically distorted, due to the different amount of information and experiences acquired everyday. TicTocTrac lets you to estimate your own perception, first by signaling the perceived duration of a given event and, then, by comparing it with the actual event duration. Finally, all the information can easily be saved to a micro SD card.

The hardware is based on a Atmega32u4, a DS3234S real-time clock and several leds to display time, while the software part is mostly based on Arduino’s DS3234S RTC library.

More information can be found here.

[Via: TicTocTrac]

Arduino Based KENBAK Computer

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

Kenbak  computer (claimed to be one of the first personal computer – 1971) has come back from the shadows of the past.

I’d been thinking for a while that emulating an old-school switches-and-lamps computer would be a fun Arduino project, but had stalled looking at things like the Altair 8800 with its 30+ lights and 20+ switches. However, when I stumbled upon the Kenbak I thought it was something I could pull off as my first real Arduino project. Naturally I called it the KENBAK-uino
This is the end-product, it can be programmed via the buttons on the front panel and show outputs on the LEDs. It’s a faithful emulation of the original CPU but with a few enhancements thrown in like pre-loaded sample programs and access to a real time clock.

via flickr (set), (videos) (code).

Heart Spark Logging & Blinking Your Beat

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011

Sensebridge is a little board that logs up to 61831 heart beats, about 14 hours of data. It is based on a atmega 168, a Real Time Clock, and 512 Kbit EEPROM. And it’s released open source.

The Heart Spark is a heart-shaped pendant which flashes little lights (light emitting diodes, LEDs) in time with your heart beat. A polar chest strap with transmitter (sold separately) is used to measure your heart beat, which is transmitted wirelessly to the pendant. An arduino-compatible circuit captures each beat as it happens and flashes LEDs (later versions will log data to an onboard EEPROM – see below). The pendant is carefully designed to maximize its visual appeal, including symmetry and optionally a high-gloss epoxy coating (as pictured to the right). A CR2032 coin-cell battery provides 8+ hours of battery life. Two small switches on the back allow selection of operating mode:

via [SenseBridge]

 

Heart Spark Logging & Blinking Your Beat

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011

Sensebridge is a little board that logs up to 61831 heart beats, about 14 hours of data. It is based on a atmega 168, a Real Time Clock, and 512 Kbit EEPROM. And it’s released open source.

The Heart Spark is a heart-shaped pendant which flashes little lights (light emitting diodes, LEDs) in time with your heart beat. A polar chest strap with transmitter (sold separately) is used to measure your heart beat, which is transmitted wirelessly to the pendant. An arduino-compatible circuit captures each beat as it happens and flashes LEDs (later versions will log data to an onboard EEPROM – see below). The pendant is carefully designed to maximize its visual appeal, including symmetry and optionally a high-gloss epoxy coating (as pictured to the right). A CR2032 coin-cell battery provides 8+ hours of battery life. Two small switches on the back allow selection of operating mode:

via [SenseBridge]

 

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