Archive for the ‘IC’ Category

Arduino Computer Vision With Video Experimenter Shield

Thursday, March 24th, 2011

[Michael] posted some interesting uses of Nootropic’s latest shield, the Video Experimenter Shield, besed on a LM1881 video sync separator to detect the timing of the vertical and horizontal sync in a composite video signal. It’s one of the few examples of Arduino processing a live video signal, as previously seen with the Eye Shield (based on the same IC, but with no video out implemented). The image here is processed and sent out from the Arduino using a custom version of the TVoutLibrary. Wow.

The Video Experimenter shield can give your Arduino the gift of sight. In the Video Frame Capture project, I showed how to capture images from a composite video source and display them on a TV. We can take this concept further by processing the contents of the captured image to implement object tracking and edge detection.

The setup is the same as when capturing video frames: a video source like a camera is connected to the video input. The output select switch is set to “overlay”, and sync select jumper set to “video input”. Set the analog threshold potentiometer to the lowest setting.

Please have a look at the other examples, such as edge detection, and using the shield to Decoding Captioning Data inside the signal.

via [nootropicDesign], also [Video Experimenter Project Page]

Gameboy ROM backups using an Arduino

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

[Alex] collects retro gaming consoles. One day while playing a SNES title, his save games got wiped when he powered off the system. It turned out that the battery inside the game cartridge got disconnected somehow, and it got him thinking. He decided he wanted to find a way to back up his save games from the cartridges for safe keeping.

While cart readers exist, he says that they are hard to find nowadays, so he decided to construct his own using an Arduino. SNES cartridges are relatively complex, so he opted to focus on Gameboy cartridges for the time being. Before attempting to back up save games, he first chose to learn how to communicate with the cartridges in general, by reading the ROM.

via [HackADay]

Must-See Beginner Tutorials For Arduino

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

[Jeremy] made ten Tutorials about Arduino worth our “All Stars” category. He talks about different themes: Blinking Leds [Intro & #2], Electrical Engineering  [#3],  Analog Inputs [#4], Motors & Transistors [#5], Serial Communication & Processing [#6], I2C & Processing [#7], SPI Interfaces [#8], Wireless Communication [#9] and Interrupts [#10].

Thanks to a generous sponsorship from element14, I’m putting together a tutorial series on using the arduino microcontroller platform!  The arduino is a platform that I’ve done several projects with, and I think it is the best possible way for beginners to get acquainted with electronics.  This tutorial series will be aimed at beginner users, but I’m hoping to keep it going with some more advanced topics a few episodes into the future.

thanks Jeremy! ++

via [JeremyBlum] [Element14]

Gameduino Brings Vintage Gaming Back

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

If Kickstarter is nowadays best place to find new (or upcoming) toys to dream about, Gameduino is probably one of the most amazing pieces of hardware I’ve seen hosted there. The shield mounts its own FPGA able of 80ies style graphics and sounds for creating old-school, 8-bit video-games, pre-loaded with numerous sprites and set up for easy connection to a VGA display.

Gameduino is a game adapter for Arduino – or anything else with an SPI interface – built as a single shield that stacks up on top of the Arduino and has plugs for a VGA monitor and stereo speakers.

The sound and graphics are definitely old-school, but thanks to the latest FPGA technology, the sprite capabilities are a step above those in machines from the past.

  • video output is 400×300 pixels in 512 colors
  • all color processed internally at 15-bit precision
  • compatible with any standard VGA monitor (800×600 @ 72Hz)
  • background graphics
    • 512×512 pixel character background
    • 256 characters, each with independent 4 color palette
    • pixel-smooth X-Y wraparound scroll
  • foreground graphics
    • each sprite is 16×16 pixels with per-pixel transparency
    • each sprite can use 256, 16 or 4 colors
    • four-way rotate and flip
    • 96 sprites per scan-line, 1536 texels per line
    • pixel-perfect sprite collision detection
  • audio output is a stereo 12-bit frequency synthesizer
  • 16 independent voices 10-4000 Hz
  • per-voice sine wave or white noise

Have a look at the nice reference poster, its detailed hardware reference or its set of sample programs and library.

support this project on [Kickstarter], via [CrunchGear] [BoingBoing] source [ExCamera]

Heart Spark Logging & Blinking Your Beat

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011

Sensebridge is a little board that logs up to 61831 heart beats, about 14 hours of data. It is based on a atmega 168, a Real Time Clock, and 512 Kbit EEPROM. And it’s released open source.

The Heart Spark is a heart-shaped pendant which flashes little lights (light emitting diodes, LEDs) in time with your heart beat. A polar chest strap with transmitter (sold separately) is used to measure your heart beat, which is transmitted wirelessly to the pendant. An arduino-compatible circuit captures each beat as it happens and flashes LEDs (later versions will log data to an onboard EEPROM – see below). The pendant is carefully designed to maximize its visual appeal, including symmetry and optionally a high-gloss epoxy coating (as pictured to the right). A CR2032 coin-cell battery provides 8+ hours of battery life. Two small switches on the back allow selection of operating mode:

via [SenseBridge]

 

Heart Spark Logging & Blinking Your Beat

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011

Sensebridge is a little board that logs up to 61831 heart beats, about 14 hours of data. It is based on a atmega 168, a Real Time Clock, and 512 Kbit EEPROM. And it’s released open source.

The Heart Spark is a heart-shaped pendant which flashes little lights (light emitting diodes, LEDs) in time with your heart beat. A polar chest strap with transmitter (sold separately) is used to measure your heart beat, which is transmitted wirelessly to the pendant. An arduino-compatible circuit captures each beat as it happens and flashes LEDs (later versions will log data to an onboard EEPROM – see below). The pendant is carefully designed to maximize its visual appeal, including symmetry and optionally a high-gloss epoxy coating (as pictured to the right). A CR2032 coin-cell battery provides 8+ hours of battery life. Two small switches on the back allow selection of operating mode:

via [SenseBridge]

 

Accordion Playing Midi Under 100$

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

Amazing Accordion sending MIDI under 100$ (instead of 6,699.00$), as [Dmitry Yegorenkov] shares on Arduino Forum and published on GitHub.

I like to play accordion & have a dog. People say dogs are singing with squeezeboxes and some people find it funny. Not for me. I know that my pet hears note harmonics much better then me & suffers from high pitches very much. I could not really practice at home just because of humanennes. That sucks. I like to play accordion. Programmers see cycle here. Let’s get out.

THIS IS IT.
It plays to headphones, produces MIDI output, etc. etc. It costs $6,699.00 on e-bay (buy now offer) on November 17, 2010. In the US I can buy Peugeot Partner for the same price. In Ukraine where i live both are 1/2 times more expensive. For that money i’ll get beautiful device to practice at home and no service centers available within 400Km radius. Weird.

Code and Schematics-ready on [Accordion Mega's Github]

CAN Shield And A MCP2515 Library

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

[DaveAK] shares his latest (uncompleted, never really complete, are they) CAN Shield.

Now I understand that there are a few CAN implementations out there, but the more the merrier, right?

This one uses the MCP2515/MCP2551 chips like most of them do. It has a switchable CS pin so that you can use other SPI shields with it that might have hardwired D10 as CS.  It has a switch to draw power from the CAN Bus if desired, if you wanted to add a WiFi or Bluetooth shield for example.  And for newbies like me it’s an entirely through hole design making it an easy DIY project.

I’ve also written a library that’s a complete implementation of the MCP2515 SPI command set.  It doesn’t yet have any wrappers for filters or masks, but these are all accessible through the read and write commands.  I have a simple Init function that takes a bus speed and clock frequency and calculates out all the necessary bit timing parameters, which makes it pretty straightforward to setup and use.

via [Arduino Forum]

Tutorial: Arduino And The AREF Pin

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Great Tutorial from TronixStuff about the less known Arduino AREF Pin. First: what is resolution?

We measure resolution in the terms of the number of bits of resolution. For example, a 1-bit resolution would only allow two (two to the power of one) values – zero and one. A 2-bit resolution would allow four (two to the power of two) values – zero, one, two and three. If we tried to measure  a five volt range with a two-bit resolution, and the measured voltage was four volts, our ADC would return a value of 3 – as four volts falls between 3.75 and 5V.

What is AREF?

AREF means Analogue REFerence. It allows us to feed the Arduino a reference voltage from an external power supply. For example, if we want to measure voltages with a maximum range of 3.3V, we would feed a nice smooth 3.3V into the AREF pin – perhaps from a voltage regulator IC. Then the each step of the ADC would represent 3.22 millivolts.

Read on this well detailed tutorial via [TronixStuff]

Make Your Own Solenoids And Play XylophoneMake Your Own Solenoids And Play XylophoneMake Your Own Solenoids And Play Xylophone

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]

 

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]