Archive for the ‘IC’ Category

Control An LCD with a 595 Shift Register

Monday, January 16th, 2012

[Carlo Denaro] is sharing a smart solution to save digital pins while controlling an LCD, using Shift Register 74HC595. A simple yet useful project with skecth&libraries, datasheets and Fritzing schematics.

via [grayhats.org]

Circuit Milling With Roland iModela, Now Available on Arduino Store

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

[Enrico Bassi] from FablabTorino brought to the extent the use of the Roland iModela, using the little (and inexpensive) desktop milling machine for pcb milling.  (in the picture we milled the overexposed Fritzing Parking Assistant).

He wrote some Scuola Lessons (here’s the first) to explain how he realized the pcb, starting from Fritzing.

Roland iModela is now on sell on the Arduino Store.

source [FablabTorino]

Portable, DIY Disco Dance Floor

Friday, December 9th, 2011

[Rave Rover's Chris Williamson] made a portable DIY dancefloor, sharing instructions and schematics.

Like with many projects similar to this, an Arduino board controls pretty much everything. The floor is dominated by powerful LED lights, which respond to a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI). A small computer is also inside (complete with Wi-fi), along with a car radio hooked up to speakers. Oh, and thanks to additional wheelchair motors, the floor can be wheeled away to wherever it’s needed.

Chris managed to build the dance floor in just one month, and documented how to do it on Instructables for anyone who wants to make their own. And now you’ve seen this, would you really want to throw a party without one?

via [PCworld] source [Instructables]

TriggerTrap, The Universal Camera Trigger

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

TriggerTrap, is a very interesting product developed by Ziah Fogel & Haje Jan Kamps. Arduino-based & open-source, is now on preorder. What does it do? (Watch Video)

(With TriggerTrap) your camera will be easily controlled in a number of ways either by sound, by breaking a laser beam, time or any other method you can think of using its built in a Aux port.

TriggerTrap comes in the well designed, finished product and with the TT Shield (75$). More info soon.

via [GeekyGadgets] source [TriggerTrap]

Arduino Circuit Bending Workshop in Torino

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Il prossimo week-end a Torino si terrà un workshop gratuito di Arduino (un kit opzionale potrà essere comprato per partecipare qualora non disponeste dei materiali elencati) sul circuit bending e la generazione di suoni con la scheda.

Un workshop di tre giorni per smontare riciclare e far suonare vecchi strumenti elettronici, creare una digital toys orchesta e sfilare in parata a Paratissima.

Il circuit Bending è una pratica molto diffusa tra gli sperimentatori musicali. Soprattutto sulla scena della musica elettronica sono sempre più frequenti gli artisti che si creano controller o addirittura strumenti musicali personalizzati.

Nel workshop saranno coinvolte diverse discipline: toy hacking, riciclo elettronico, elettronica di base, sintesi sonora, programmazione ad oggetti e faremo largo uso di Arduino per comandare i nuovi strumenti.

Il workshop è gratuito, a carico dei partecipanti il costo dei materiali e l’acquisto del kit-workshop.
maggiori informazioni quì!

Per partecipare registrati qui.

via [FablabItalia]

Ball of Dub Keeps Audio in Your Hands

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Ball of Dub from LUSTlab on Vimeo.

Accelerometer to Renoise via OSC  to control trippy and dubby sounds.

[Lizzie] from LustLab sent in her Ball of Dub that turns a few accelerometer and a digital audio workstation and turns everything into an aural experience of wubs and dubs. The Ball of Dub can turn just about anything into dubstep, and does so with a fairly interesting user interface.

There isn’t a build log for the Ball of Dub, but  the folks at LustLab did send in a basic overview of her project. Inside the ball, there’s a Razor IMU from Sparkfun that is attached to the ever-popular XBee wireless transceiver. A tiny program on an Arduino calibrates the gyroscope and accelerometer and sends that data to the DAW at 50Hz.

The host computer is running Renoise, a very popular tracker that can accept MIDI and OSC input. A Processing app parses the ball spin, free fall and impact, averages them over a period of time, and pipes that into the OSC input of Renoise. In [Lizzie]‘s video, the ball spin is sent to a low-pass filter on the baseline track, and the average impact is applied to the vocal track.

via [HackADay] source [LustLab Tumblr] special demo video for the few skeptical comments on HackADay

TinkerKit! Gyroscope Now Available

Monday, October 10th, 2011

New fellows in the TinkerKit!  family: [T000060] and [T000062] are two versions of the same gyroscope module (1x / 4x sensitivity) based on the LPR5150AL from ST Microelectronics. We are sharing example codes and a visual UI in Processing (hosted on Scuola)

Time To Go Matrix

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

We are happily announcing two new products in the Arduino Store: [E000011] 32×08 Red LED 5mm Matrix and [E000013] 32*16 Green/Red LED 3mm Matrix from Sure Electronics. Both products are coming with tutorials and related projects.

Have a good prototyping!

 

 

 

 

Arduino Based KENBAK Computer

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

Kenbak  computer (claimed to be one of the first personal computer – 1971) has come back from the shadows of the past.

I’d been thinking for a while that emulating an old-school switches-and-lamps computer would be a fun Arduino project, but had stalled looking at things like the Altair 8800 with its 30+ lights and 20+ switches. However, when I stumbled upon the Kenbak I thought it was something I could pull off as my first real Arduino project. Naturally I called it the KENBAK-uino
This is the end-product, it can be programmed via the buttons on the front panel and show outputs on the LEDs. It’s a faithful emulation of the original CPU but with a few enhancements thrown in like pre-loaded sample programs and access to a real time clock.

via flickr (set), (videos) (code).

Listening To The Walls’ Whispers

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

[Pierre] shares an interesting geo-localization project of sound, narration and  culture,  made in  ”plan d’Aou”, a district of Marseilles – France. The project dates back in September 2010, within the framework of the Smala project in order to trace a sound cartography of Islam in the city of Marseilles: the guys at [Echelle Inconnue] took their time to fully document the all project with schematics, codes, fritzing diagrams and so on.

Several mobile systems were distributed to the people to accompany their walk across the district with, by hand, a kind of speaker to be press on the walls which makes it possible to listen to the sound by vibrating the material of the wall.

The materials of urban furniture or buildings become the speakers required for sound diffusion. Each resonant body had its acoustic specificities, the words take shape in metal, wood or glass… Textures of the sound fluctuate from a surface to another and the listener must juggle with these characteristics to obtain a quality of optimal listening, between documentary in the walls and poetic sound creation.

source [echelleinconnue]