Archive for the ‘ADC’ Category

Arduino and the LTC2440 24bit ADC

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Have you ever wondered how to improve the resolution of analog readings of your Arduino board? If yes, this is for you.

John Beale, discussing on the Dangerous Prototypes’ forum, quickly describes how to connect a Linear’s LTC2440 ADC to an Arduino board, which will provide you with an amazing 24 bit resolution.

The ADC, which is available in a SSOP package, can be connected to the Arduino via the SPI bus. Here John provides a brief sketch and some very useful comments to make it working properly.

[Via: Dangerous Prototypes]

DIY Radio Control

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Going to buy a new Wireless Controller for your next Robotics project. Why buy a new one when you can Do-It-Yourself? All you need is an Arduino, an old Joystick with a Gameport (15-pin connector) and a pair of Series 1 xBee Modules.

The explanation of the xBee Configuration and the xBee Packet Description is very well done at the blog.

Block Diagram

Transmitter: Joystick + xBee [No additional hardware needed]
Receiver: xBee + Arduino + [your amazing Robot, Car or a Plane!]

Schematic

 

Tutorial: Arduino And The AREF Pin

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Great Tutorial from TronixStuff about the less known Arduino AREF Pin. First: what is resolution?

We measure resolution in the terms of the number of bits of resolution. For example, a 1-bit resolution would only allow two (two to the power of one) values – zero and one. A 2-bit resolution would allow four (two to the power of two) values – zero, one, two and three. If we tried to measure  a five volt range with a two-bit resolution, and the measured voltage was four volts, our ADC would return a value of 3 – as four volts falls between 3.75 and 5V.

What is AREF?

AREF means Analogue REFerence. It allows us to feed the Arduino a reference voltage from an external power supply. For example, if we want to measure voltages with a maximum range of 3.3V, we would feed a nice smooth 3.3V into the AREF pin – perhaps from a voltage regulator IC. Then the each step of the ADC would represent 3.22 millivolts.

Read on this well detailed tutorial via [TronixStuff]

Tired Of A 10 Bit Res? Hook Up A Better Analog-To-Digital ConverterTired Of A 10 Bit Res? Hook Up A Better Analog-To-Digital ConverterTired Of A 10 Bit Res? Hook Up A Better Analog-To-Digital Converter

Monday, November 29th, 2010

 

[Martin Nawrath] from Lab3, Cologne, made a nice  ADC tutorial based on the 18bit LTC2400:

If the resolution of the Arduino is not enough for your application you have to try it with a better ADC. The LTC2400 gives you a resolution of up to 24 bit at a datarate of 5 samples per seconds  and is quite  simple to connect. With this device you can connect sensors which have only a low output level like thermo couples or force strain gauges. The high sensitivity can make the use of  of an preamp needless.

[Martin Nawrath] from Lab3, Cologne, made a nice ADC tutorial based on the 18bit LTC2400:

If the resolution of the Arduino is not enough for your application you have to try it with a better ADC. The LTC2400 gives you a resolution of up to 24 bit at a datarate of 5 samples per seconds and is quite simple to connect. With this device you can connect sensors which have only a low output level like thermo couples or force strain gauges. The high sensitivity can make the use of of an preamp needless.

 

[Martin Nawrath] from Lab3, Cologne, made a nice  ADC tutorial based on the 18bit LTC2400:

If the resolution of the Arduino is not enough for your application you have to try it with a better ADC. The LTC2400 gives you a resolution of up to 24 bit at a datarate of 5 samples per seconds  and is quite  simple to connect. With this device you can connect sensors which have only a low output level like thermo couples or force strain gauges. The high sensitivity can make the use of  of an preamp needless.

(more…)