Archive for the ‘Hardware’ Category

Make a voice call with Arduino Gsm Shield & more examples!

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

Arduino Gsm Shield

Some days ago we launched our new product, the Arduino Gsm Shield, together with an intro video explaining how to make the first steps into the creation of interaction with it.
Today we’re publishing another video with a second step-by-step tutorial by David:

 

 

And we want to share some more because last year at the Malmo University K3 during the second year in Interaction Design BA, David Cuartielles and Tony Olsson run a course where students had to work on a project with state of the art of technology using wireless communication as a main mode of operation.

As one of the tools, 30 students could experiment with early prototypes of the GSM shield  and they came out with different projects and ideas.  Here you can see one of the proposals that made it to the finals at a M2M contest arranged in Sweden by Tele2. (more…)

A visit to the Arduino factory on DomusWeb

Friday, March 15th, 2013

Arduino Factory

The entire manufacturing process (except for certain purchased components) [of Arduino boards] takes place in and around Strambino, Ivrea, in a context dominated by the small- and medium-sized companies that are typical of Italian industrial districts and of the “Made in Italy” phenomenon itself.

Ivrea’s history is another interesting part of the picture. The city was intimately tied to the presence of Olivetti, a company with a legacy of incredible electronics know-how, and an entire generation of experts. In fact, the Interaction Design Institute was established in a former Olivetti building randomly covered with blue tiles — just like the Arduino boards. The company still exists as a brand, but it is no longer involved in design and development. If Olivetti had not been there before, maybe Arduino would not exist today.

This is an extract from an article by Alice Mela and published today on DomusWeb.

 

A thermometer of future temps with the Arduino GSM Shield

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013

thermometer

Things you can do with the new Arduino Gsm Shield: a thermometer of future temps!

 

 

Dive into the Internet-of-Things world with the new Arduino GSM Shield

Monday, March 11th, 2013

Arduino Gsm Shield

We are excited to announce that the new Arduino GSM Shield is ready to be shipped allowing Arduino boards (Uno, MEGA and Leonardo) to explore the wonders of adding a GPRS/GSM connection to interactive projects.

We teamed up with Telefónica Digital to design a tool that is greatly simplifying the process of building Internet of Things applications based on the GSM mobile phone network and controlled through the internet anywhere there is mobile phone coverage.

 

 

Every shield is equipped with a SIM card ready to be plugged in and used within a special worldwide data tariff especially created for the product by Telefónica but you can use any SIM from other providers.
As you can see from the video above, the activation process is really simple and fast through the BlueVia website where you can login with your Arduino account and be online in minutes! (more…)

Exceptionally Hard and Soft meeting at Berlin 28-30 December 2012 (Part2)

Sunday, January 20th, 2013
Arduino at EHSM 2012

Arduino at EHSM 2012

We mentioned earlier about the very special geek way of entering new year 2013. So here is a first hand, un-altered account of Tricia Blickfeldt who participated in the Arduino workshop for kids held there. We now are richer by one more arduino user! Yay! :)

“Before I tell you about the conference, I have to say that I work in Special Education at an elementary school. I am surrounded by children all day every day. Many of them with disabilities. I am not an engineer. I am not a hacker. My gifts do not include technical things. I came to the conference as a friend of one of the presenters. Many of the presentations were foreign to me. I felt very welcomed though and learned a lot. The staff were all very helpful and kind.

I was excited and nervous to participate in the arduino workshop. My friend told me that the class was created for kids with no experience. This was comforting. Kid things are right up my alley. And I certainly had no experience. There had been some last minute changes in teachers for the class, but I was very impressed with the guys who presented the workshop. It was clear that they knew and were very experienced in what they were teaching. When we arrived and there were no kids and, much to my dismay, they changed up what/how they were going to teach. I was soon put at ease though as they began at the beginning and explained what arduino is, what it does, and why it is so amazing and useful. They adjusted to their audience without making it more complicated.

I got really anxious again as they started handing out several little parts for us to build on the arduino board. The directions however were clear and precise. Illustrations were shown and questions were welcomed and answered. I set up an LED light and programmed it to go! The programming was not difficult because we just had to look up the codes for the task we wanted and apply them to what built. To do this we had to name the light in the program so it knew where to apply the command.

Then we added a button and programmed that to make the light go when we pushed it! We had to make some modifications to the code to add the button. I was so excited. We had some time to add more lights and see what we could make them do. I lined them up and programmed them to flash in a row and then back! This was a little trickier to program because we had to name each light individually and tell it to go in sequence. Who knew that I was capable of that?

Finally, we added a knob to control the speed of the blinking. This was definitely the hardest for me to understand. We had to set a delay that corresponded to the position of the knob. I was so excited that I took pictures and videos to prove that I really did it and that it really worked!

I was very impressed at how professional the presentation was. It was given in a way that created meaning and understanding without being overwhelming. It allowed me to create things that I hadn’t ever imagined myself doing. I am motivated now to find a project to work on using what I learned in the arduino workshop.

The entire conference seemed to be a lot like the workshop. It was very pleasant and friendly to all who were there regardless of background or expertise. It was professional and the presenters were all very knowledgeable. I learned a lot and enjoyed my time at the conference.”

PS: Many many thanks Tomek and his friend, for filling in the last minute!

Enabling F-bus communications with Arduino

Saturday, January 19th, 2013

It’s always nice to see how creative makers approach communication issues in DIY projects, and today we would like to highlight the approach followed by Alex, from InsideGadgets.

On his website, he provides a detailed tutorial on how to use an old Nokia 6110 (or any derivatives) to send SMS messages by exploiting the Nokia’s F-bus, a simple bi-directional and full-duplex serial protocol.

After considerable reverse engineering work, made possible by useful online documentation, Alex finally managed to send a SMS from his Arduino board, connected to the phone, thanks to AVR libraries made available by AVRFreaks.

More information can be found on InsideGadget.

[Via: Inside Gadgets]

An Arduino-based ADB-to-USB adapter for NeXT keyboards

Thursday, January 10th, 2013

Have you ever wondered to use your old-fashioned NeXT keyboard with your current, non-ADB computer? The main issue that needs to be solved regards how to interface this ADB keyboard (standing for Apple Desktop Bus, an old protocol used in former NeXT and Apple computers) with a standard USB interface.

In this nice tutorial, Ladyada and Pt describe the approach they have used, based on an Arduino Micro board and… some luck in searching for the right information about the scancode table of the keyboard  ^^.

More information can be found here.

[Via: Adafruit Learning System]

 

New Arduino Micro available

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

We’re happy to announce the release of the new Arduino Micro board.

The Arduino Micro packs all of the power of the Arduino Leonardo in a 48mm x 18mm module (1.9? x 0.7?).

It makes it easier for makers to embed the Arduino technology inside their projects by providing a small and convenient module that can be either used on a breadboard or soldered to a custom designed PCB.

The Micro has been developed in collaboration with Adafruit Industries, one of the leaders of the Maker movement. Adafruit is already developing a series of accessories for the new board that will complement its power and simplicity.

Throughout the month of November the product is available exclusively from Adafruit online and Radio Shack in retail stores.

Main features of Arduino Micro:

  • The Arduino Micro is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega32u4.
  • Like its brother the Leonardo board, the Arduino Micro has one microcontroller with built-in USB. Using the ATmega32U4 as its sole microcontroller allows it to be cheaper and simpler. Also, because the 32U4 is handling the USB directly, code libraries are available which allow the board to emulate a computer keyboard, mouse, and more using the USB-HID protocol.
  • It has 20 digital input/output pins (of which 7 can be used as PWM outputs and 12 as analog inputs), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a micro USB cable to get started.
  • This allows the Micro to appear to a connected computer as a mouse and keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC) serial / COM port.

Technical specifications:

  • Microcontroller: ATmega32u4
  • Operating Voltage: 5V
  • Input Voltage (recommended): 7-12V
  • Input Voltage (limits): 6-20V
  • Digital I/O Pins: 20
  • PWM Channels: 7
  • Analog Input Channels: 12
  • DC Current per I/O Pin: 40 mA
  • DC Current for 3.3V Pin: 50 mA
  • Flash Memory: 32 KB (ATmega32u4) of which 4 KB used by bootloader
  • SRAM: 2.5 KB (ATmega32u4)
  • EEPROM: 1 KB (ATmega32u4)
  • Clock Speed: 16 MHz

Arduino Due VGA Signal Out

Monday, November 5th, 2012

Photo credit: [Stimmer] on the Arduino Forum

[Stimmer] on the Arduino Forum hardcoded a way to display 160×240 (320×240 after some posts) VGA signal.

After working out how to do a timer interrupt I’ve had a go at making a VGA framebuffer. It is rather low-res at present(160×240) and fuzzy but I hope to be able to improve that. It has 8-bit colour (RRRGGGBB).
I cannot get Eagle to run right now so will have to describe the schematic in text:
Due pin 2 -> VGA pin 13 (HSync)
Due pin 3 -> VGA pin 14 (VSync)

Due pin 25 -> 820R resistor -> VGA pin 3 (blue)
Due pin 26 -> 390R resistor -> VGA pin 3 (blue)

Due pin 27 -> 2k2 resistor -> VGA pin 2 (green)
Due pin 28 -> 1k resistor -> VGA pin 2 (green)
Due pin 14 -> 470R resistor -> VGA pin 2 (green)

Due pin 15 -> 2k2 resistor -> VGA pin 1 (red)
Due pin 29 -> 1k resistor -> VGA pin 1 (red)
Due pin 11 -> 470R resistor -> VGA pin 1(red)

Due pin GND -> VGA pins 5,6,7,8,10

Via [Arduino Forum]

Arduino Due is finally here

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Today we release the latest addition to the Arduino family: the Arduino Due

(more…)