Archive for the ‘Home Hacks’ Category

Arduino Controlled Dishwasher

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

Arduino Forum User [UnaClocker] shared a cool hack on its Maytag dishwasher:

The control panel on the front of it died, it failed from corrosion getting into the laminated plastic PCB that it’s made up of. Not really repairable, just meant to be replaced, except that it’s a $150 part. From what I could find online, it seems to be a common failure, so why buy an overpriced part that’s just going to fail all over again?This is one of the things I love about the Arduino, it allows me to consider alternatives that I’d have NEVER been able to consider before. If I had to program a controller in assembly, or flat do it with just discrete chips, I’d have never considered this as an option. But with the Arduino, not only can I build my own controller, but it’s almost stupidly simple to do.

via [Arduino Forum] source [NeonSquirt] with Code!

Kinect Controlled Delta-Robot

Monday, March 7th, 2011

Everybody’s amazed about the incredible things done with Kinect and Processing + Arduino. Tutorial need!

This is a project in development for the module “Digital Ecologies”, at the Bartlett’s Adaptive Architecture and Computation MSc. – University College London

A Delta-Robot is controlled by a Kinect through Processing and Arduino. The movements of the performer control directly the position of the robot’s effector, and the rotation and opening of the gripper.
Once the plattform is properly calibrated (still a little rough round the edges!), several autonomous behaviours will be implemented.

have a look at [resources]via [KinectHacks]

WiFi Enabled Whole House Power Meter

Monday, January 10th, 2011

The Open Hardware web community has made plenty of examples about power monitoring and consumption knowledge: from ladyada’s tweet-a-watt to Jarv’s Home power Monitoring. [Greg] shares code & circuits on his own power monitoring system based on Wifi Communication.

First things first – this project is a blatant and obvious rip-off of John Jarvis’ power monitoring project! A few minor details have changed but I have to give him credit for a great project idea. I was intrigued by John’s power meter and it gave me an excuse to buy and try an Arduino – a handy and fun little embedded project platform! John’s power meter uses the ethernet shield and some CGI scripts, etc., to talk with his server – I went with AsyncLabs WiShield to put my power meter onto the network – my backend to get the data to the server is also a bit different (but of course).

The basic idea of the project is that an Arduino Duemilanove is continuously reading the analog pins that a couple TED Current Tranducers are connected to (one per phase). The Arduino does a little smoothing/averaging of the data and waits for an IP connection to send that data out on. Another machine has a Win32 service running on it and every minute it queries the power meter for its current data; the data that is received is stuffed into a MySQL data base. When a web request comes in to view the data a few pre-canned charts are generated real time and returned to the web user’s browser.

via [SlackLab]

 

Nunchuck Controlled 3D Cube On TV

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

[Paul]  took the TVout library, the Wiichuck library and wrote it’s own 3D library. In this way he’s got a nunchuck controlled 3D shape on TV

Movement in the nunchuck is detected by the arduino, then the cube is redrawn according to new angle of the controller. 3d wireframe library header and source. Code to tie everything together

via [Paulsarduino]

Hacking Christmas Lights

Friday, December 10th, 2010

We are all waiting for consumer electronics producers to sell hacking-friendly, repairable products.

While we wait we can all enjoy [Darco] Christmas Lights Hack. He reverse engineered the leds protocol and the remote control of the GE Color Effects G-35.

The protocol on the data line is simple and self-clocked. Here are the low-level details:

  • Idle bus state: Low
  • Start Bit: High for 10µSeconds
  • 0 Bit: Low for 10µSeconds, High for 20µSeconds
  • 1 Bit: Low for 20µSeconds, High for 10µSeconds
  • Minimum quiet-time between frames: 30µSeconds

Each frame is 26 bits long and has the following format:

  • Start bit
  • 6-Bit Bulb Address, MSB first
  • 8-Bit Brightness, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Blue, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Green, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Red, MSB first

From this we can see that we have a color depth of 12 bits. Not terribly great, but this should still be plenty for our purposes. What is interesting is the Brightness field. This field acts a bit like a multiplier and enables smooth fade-ins and fade-outs.

Merry Hacking Christmas!

via [Deep Darc] code [Here]

GardenBot Is Monitoring Your Garden

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

 

Very interesting bottom-up product (but it’s not really a product, it’s more of an experience of nature-lovers and DIYers) do look after your garden:

GardenBot is a garden monitoring system. This means that you put sensors in your garden, and GardenBot will show you charts of the conditions in your garden — so you can see the world the way your plants see it.

(more…)

GardenBot Is Monitoring Your Garden

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

 

Very interesting bottom-up product (but it’s not really a product, it’s more of an experience of nature-lovers and DIYers) do look after your garden:

GardenBot is a garden monitoring system. This means that you put sensors in your garden, and GardenBot will show you charts of the conditions in your garden — so you can see the world the way your plants see it.

(more…)

Mobile Home Automation Via Android

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

I created this project and my target is improve the comfort of my home. Taking a look around I noticed that home automation solution proposed by the big market player are too much expensive for me and, above all, I should create new wires connections between light, plug, etc.. and the control box.
My idea is use what we already have without spend lot of money to buy a owner solution, so I started with arduino, my android mobile phone, some relays and my home.
I have a nice home, 2 bad rooms, kitchen with living room and it was very nice tka e the control of the lights, gate and door with my mobile phone.

[Mattia] have realized home automation via internet, using:

[...] an Arduino 2009 with ethernet shield and the game is very easy, I send some http message to arduino, he moves some relays and give me back a JSON response. Not so hard, but the hard business is interfacing with the electrical wiring of home, with some patience I found what I need and I linked those wires at the relays.

A chi non è mai capitato di restare chiuso fuori casa senza le chiavi? Beh a noi spesso e ci sarebbe piaciuto aprire il nostro cancello o porta di ingresso usando il telefono cellulare che abbiamo sempre con noi, il bisogno aguzza l’ingegno…ed ecco fatto! Ci siamo guardati un attimo in giro ed abbiamo recuperato un po’ di informazioni su Arduino, la sua filosofia a “brick” ci è sembrata l’ideale per fare quello che avevamo in mente, il mio HTC Hero con Android OS ha fatto il resto.

[Mattia] ha realizzato un progetto di automazione domestica usando Arduino Duemilanove e Ethernet Shield:

[...]Bisogna far comunicare Arduino con il nostro telefono, la soluzione più pulita che mi è balzata in mente era quella di usare il protoccolo http per farsì che la comunicazione avvenga  e JSON per scambiarsi i dati agilemente.

Più informazioni sul sito [nerdyDog]

via [ArduinoForum] source [nerdyDog]

(more…)

Arduino Heart Rate Monitor LCD

Monday, September 13th, 2010

 

 

 

 

Youtube user [npaltmp] hacked up a alphanumeric LCD from a defective answering machine, an ear clip pulse sensor from a stationary exercise bike and interfaced it with an Arduino “using a simple circuit which normalizes the photo-transistor’s output voltage and amplifies fluctuations”.

The Arduino senses rises and falls in voltage on one of its analog inputs and counts them as heartbeats. Motion is sensed with a crudely built vibrations sensor attached to my bed. It consists of a coiled thin wire pendulum which makes intermittent contact with a loop shaped electrode during vibrations. It is wired to the Arduino just like a button. Originally I had all heart beat events reported to a running desktop computer for logging, but I disliked this because it seemed silly to keeps a ~200 watt machine powered up for 8+ hours to collect only kilobytes of data. I reduced sampling rates, and made some other compromises in data collection, and now the sleep monitor stores data in the ATmega328’s 2kb of ram. When I turn on my computer in the morning, I can download the data with a C# application and have it stored to a comma separated value format file. CSV files load easily into Excel for analysis.

No code or Schematic is provided (some schematic can be found googling though)

Via [nopaltmp] on youtube

 

 

 

 

Arduino Heart Rate Monitor LCD

Monday, September 13th, 2010

 

 

 

 

Youtube user [npaltmp] hacked up a alphanumeric LCD from a defective answering machine, an ear clip pulse sensor from a stationary exercise bike and interfaced it with an Arduino “using a simple circuit which normalizes the photo-transistor’s output voltage and amplifies fluctuations”.

The Arduino senses rises and falls in voltage on one of its analog inputs and counts them as heartbeats. Motion is sensed with a crudely built vibrations sensor attached to my bed. It consists of a coiled thin wire pendulum which makes intermittent contact with a loop shaped electrode during vibrations. It is wired to the Arduino just like a button. Originally I had all heart beat events reported to a running desktop computer for logging, but I disliked this because it seemed silly to keeps a ~200 watt machine powered up for 8+ hours to collect only kilobytes of data. I reduced sampling rates, and made some other compromises in data collection, and now the sleep monitor stores data in the ATmega328’s 2kb of ram. When I turn on my computer in the morning, I can download the data with a C# application and have it stored to a comma separated value format file. CSV files load easily into Excel for analysis.

No code or Schematic is provided (some schematic can be found googling though)

Via [nopaltmp] on youtube

 

 

 

 

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