Archive for the ‘eHome’ Category

Arduino Day a Roma, 14 Aprile 2011

Monday, April 11th, 2011

Il prossimo 14 aprile (giovedì) Massimo parlerà a Roma in occasione dell’Arduino Day, una giornata di conoscenza delle possibilità di Arduino a livello didattico e formativo. Le possibilità Arduino come mezzo educativo nelle scuole era stata presentata a fine dell’anno scorso in occasione di questo evento a Torino, seguito da un corso tenuto da me presso alcune scuole del circuito Dschola. Ora grazie all’associazione discienza abbiamo la possibilità di parlare a Roma, e finalmente conoscere un po’ di realtà locali.

Arduino Day è una giornata dedicata a far conoscere a docenti, ricercatori, artisti e ragazzi la piattaforma Arduino.

L’iniziativa, organizzata dall’associazione per la divulgazione scientifica DiScienza, nasce con l’obiettivo di catalizzare il sempre maggiore interesse nei confronti del progetto Arduino, e di convogliarlo in un’unica giornata in cui sarà possibile conoscere le diverse realtà che utilizzano la piattaforma e approcciarne alcune applicazioni.

segui il [thread sul forum di Arduino].

Arduino Candy Grabber, Web Controlled.

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

A step-by-step guide on controlling physical things (like grabbing candies with a mechanical arm) via Internet (please, try!).

In this instructable you will learn how to connect to your arduino and control it over the net, set up a video stream, and how to control stuff with your arduino all in realtime. I’ll try to show you on a concrete example how this could be done, but the code I used and wrote is going to be generic so you can use it for your projects. Note that I haven’t discovered anything new but rather used code that I found lying around the net, built from it and changed it fit my needs.

(…) So how should it work? The idea is that there is a Flash AIR app on my home computer that when a remote client connects to it starts the video broadcast. The communication between the client and the AIR app would be through a PHP socket because it can instantly push messages from one to the other. The socket will handle all the clients and the queuing. The Red5 server is used to handle the video broadcast, stream the video and send the arduino commands from the client that is first in the queue to the AIR app (although it could do so much more… we’ll talk about that in a later step). Finally TinkerProxy is used to send commands from the AIR app to the arduino that is connected to the same computer.

Thanks to Mario for the link!

via [Instructables], grab the thing [here]

RFID-based Dispencer Answers To The Question: Did I Already Take This Pill?

Friday, March 25th, 2011

[Mark Fickett] shares a nice solution to keep track of  pils and medecines his mother takes.

When taking her battery of medicines, my mother occasionally loses — or, lost — track of which ones she had already taken. This aims to keep track of what’s been taken (and how recently); and also to provide a night light, as long as it’s taking up an electrical outlet.

(more…)

Illutron Ship Gets Remote-Controlled

Friday, March 11th, 2011

[Christian] from Illutron hackespace in Copenhagen managed to control and monitor this ship (Illutron) from the internet.

Today, it is finally possible to remotely monitor the ship. In essence: I am sitting in the warm comfort of my home, and with a glance at my phone, I can see, that the sinking alarm in the machinery room is dry. The light is out in the Mess room. All is nice at our little lovely ship out there in the dark, cold Sydhavn.
Actually, behind this lies a pretty clever system (I think I am allowed to brag a little :-), that makes it possible to monitor events on sensors on the ship, and trigger that messages is sent to Google
Talk users. (if you have a gmail, you have Google Talk) It is also possible via your chat, to send commands to the ship, and get reading from sensors when you want them.[...] Basicly, we can monitor anything, that can be plugged into an Arduino board. One thing I would love, is a temperature sensor for the Mess room. Bring the sensor, and I will mount it So far, we have
– a light sensor, that reports if it is light or dark in the Mess (the electronics room)
– a new water level sensor. I didn’t dare mess with the old system, so I am putting in new float sensors

Things can still be developed a lot, and it will be – Suggestions would be happily received.
Thanks and hello to Stephane and Olle that came by to visit us at the sunday meeting, and ended up staying all evening – for help with sensor mounting and JavaScript improvements!

Have a look at this Ship Automation project on [Christian Liljedahl project page] and [Illutron site]

WiFi Enabled Whole House Power Meter

Monday, January 10th, 2011

The Open Hardware web community has made plenty of examples about power monitoring and consumption knowledge: from ladyada’s tweet-a-watt to Jarv’s Home power Monitoring. [Greg] shares code & circuits on his own power monitoring system based on Wifi Communication.

First things first – this project is a blatant and obvious rip-off of John Jarvis’ power monitoring project! A few minor details have changed but I have to give him credit for a great project idea. I was intrigued by John’s power meter and it gave me an excuse to buy and try an Arduino – a handy and fun little embedded project platform! John’s power meter uses the ethernet shield and some CGI scripts, etc., to talk with his server – I went with AsyncLabs WiShield to put my power meter onto the network – my backend to get the data to the server is also a bit different (but of course).

The basic idea of the project is that an Arduino Duemilanove is continuously reading the analog pins that a couple TED Current Tranducers are connected to (one per phase). The Arduino does a little smoothing/averaging of the data and waits for an IP connection to send that data out on. Another machine has a Win32 service running on it and every minute it queries the power meter for its current data; the data that is received is stuffed into a MySQL data base. When a web request comes in to view the data a few pre-canned charts are generated real time and returned to the web user’s browser.

via [SlackLab]

 

Seg..Stick – A Stick-Controlled, Arduino-Based Segway

Sunday, December 26th, 2010

[scolton] made a nice self-balaced vehicle based on two DeWalt cordless drills and an Arduino Nano:

Segstick is a self-balancing…well, literally some kind of broomstick I found in the MITERS workshop. It is powered direct by two DeWalt cordless drills chucked to two 6″ wheels. The controller is an Arduino. Additional supporting devices include an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from Sparkfun and two motor drivers from Pololu .

see the compete how-to on [Instructables]

Arduino Ethernet And The GymArduino Ethernet And the GymArduino Ethernet e La Gestione Della Palestra

Monday, November 15th, 2010

 

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli and Alex Rigamonti have recently finished a server-controlled system to monitor the access of the customers in a gym using a prototype of the Arduino Ethernet, RFID, and digital sensors of a turnstile.

The system was meant to monitor easily the different kind of tickets and timing people may have in a gym. To accomplish that we use a turnstile at the entrance and an RFID reader to authenticate the customer. The RFID reader sends the data to Arduino via serial (TTL). Arduino checks the received data and sends it on a server via ethernet. The server controls and authenticate: ticket, time, day, expiry date and all the credits the customer has. This is the time when the server tells the Arduino to open the turnstile by triggering some relays.

Using the Arduino Ethernet made the all process flexible & cheap: controlling the turnstile, interfacing the RFID and sending the data to a linux server over RJ45.

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli and Alex Rigamonti have recently finished a server-controlled system to monitor the access of the customers in a gym using a prototype of the Arduino Ethernet, RFID, and digital sensors of a turnstile.

The system was meant to monitor easily the different kind of tickets and timing people may have in a gym. To accomplish that we use a turnstile at the entrance and an RFID reader to authenticate the customer. The RFID reader sends the data to Arduino via serial (TTL). Arduino checks the received data and sends it on a server via ethernet. The server controls and authenticate: ticket, time, day, expiry date and all the credits the customer has. This is the time when the server tells the Arduino to open the turnstile by triggering some relays.

Using the Arduino Ethernet made the all process flexible & cheap: controlling the turnstile, interfacing the RFID and sending the data to a linux server over RJ45.

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli ed Alex Rigamonti hanno recentemente portato a termine un progetto molto interessante che aveva come obiettivo il controllo centralizzato degli accessi ad una palestra, via server.

Il sistema è stato ideato per rendere più facile la gestione degli abbonamenti e del flusso in ingresso della palestra. Per far ciò è stato predisposto un tornello all’ingresso del locale con un lettore RFID per effettuare l’autenticazione.

L’utente avvicina la tessera RFID al lettore che a sua volta manda i dati tramite seriale (TTL) ad Arduino. Arduino verifica il dato ricevuto e a sua volta trasmette i dati ad un server tramite ethernet.

Il server effettua il controllo dei dati: esistenza abbonamento associato alla tessera, orario e giorno di accesso consentito, controllo crediti e scadenza dello stesso

A questo punto il server  trasmette  il comando ad Arduino Ethernet per l’apertura del tornello svolta tramite il pilotaggio di relays.

L’utilizzo di Arduino ha reso possibile, con un costo molto contenuto e con un’ottima flessibilità, di interfacciare il tornello, che ha solo ingressi digitali per il comando, ad un server linux tramite la ben nota RJ45.

(more…)

Arduino Ethernet And The GymArduino Ethernet And the GymArduino Ethernet e La Gestione Della Palestra

Monday, November 15th, 2010

 

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli and Alex Rigamonti have recently finished a server-controlled system to monitor the access of the customers in a gym using a prototype of the Arduino Ethernet, RFID, and digital sensors of a turnstile.

The system was meant to monitor easily the different kind of tickets and timing people may have in a gym. To accomplish that we use a turnstile at the entrance and an RFID reader to authenticate the customer. The RFID reader sends the data to Arduino via serial (TTL). Arduino checks the received data and sends it on a server via ethernet. The server controls and authenticate: ticket, time, day, expiry date and all the credits the customer has. This is the time when the server tells the Arduino to open the turnstile by triggering some relays.

Using the Arduino Ethernet made the all process flexible & cheap: controlling the turnstile, interfacing the RFID and sending the data to a linux server over RJ45.

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli and Alex Rigamonti have recently finished a server-controlled system to monitor the access of the customers in a gym using a prototype of the Arduino Ethernet, RFID, and digital sensors of a turnstile.

The system was meant to monitor easily the different kind of tickets and timing people may have in a gym. To accomplish that we use a turnstile at the entrance and an RFID reader to authenticate the customer. The RFID reader sends the data to Arduino via serial (TTL). Arduino checks the received data and sends it on a server via ethernet. The server controls and authenticate: ticket, time, day, expiry date and all the credits the customer has. This is the time when the server tells the Arduino to open the turnstile by triggering some relays.

Using the Arduino Ethernet made the all process flexible & cheap: controlling the turnstile, interfacing the RFID and sending the data to a linux server over RJ45.

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli ed Alex Rigamonti hanno recentemente portato a termine un progetto molto interessante che aveva come obiettivo il controllo centralizzato degli accessi ad una palestra, via server.

Il sistema è stato ideato per rendere più facile la gestione degli abbonamenti e del flusso in ingresso della palestra. Per far ciò è stato predisposto un tornello all’ingresso del locale con un lettore RFID per effettuare l’autenticazione.

L’utente avvicina la tessera RFID al lettore che a sua volta manda i dati tramite seriale (TTL) ad Arduino. Arduino verifica il dato ricevuto e a sua volta trasmette i dati ad un server tramite ethernet.

Il server effettua il controllo dei dati: esistenza abbonamento associato alla tessera, orario e giorno di accesso consentito, controllo crediti e scadenza dello stesso

A questo punto il server  trasmette  il comando ad Arduino Ethernet per l’apertura del tornello svolta tramite il pilotaggio di relays.

L’utilizzo di Arduino ha reso possibile, con un costo molto contenuto e con un’ottima flessibilità, di interfacciare il tornello, che ha solo ingressi digitali per il comando, ad un server linux tramite la ben nota RJ45.

(more…)

Place-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy ConsumptionPlace-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy ConsumptionPlace-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy Consumption

Monday, November 8th, 2010

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

 

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

Place-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy ConsumptionPlace-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy ConsumptionPlace-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy Consumption

Monday, November 8th, 2010

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

 

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

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