Archive for the ‘eHome’ Category

Illutron Ship Gets Remote-Controlled

Friday, March 11th, 2011

[Christian] from Illutron hackespace in Copenhagen managed to control and monitor this ship (Illutron) from the internet.

Today, it is finally possible to remotely monitor the ship. In essence: I am sitting in the warm comfort of my home, and with a glance at my phone, I can see, that the sinking alarm in the machinery room is dry. The light is out in the Mess room. All is nice at our little lovely ship out there in the dark, cold Sydhavn.
Actually, behind this lies a pretty clever system (I think I am allowed to brag a little :-), that makes it possible to monitor events on sensors on the ship, and trigger that messages is sent to Google
Talk users. (if you have a gmail, you have Google Talk) It is also possible via your chat, to send commands to the ship, and get reading from sensors when you want them.[...] Basicly, we can monitor anything, that can be plugged into an Arduino board. One thing I would love, is a temperature sensor for the Mess room. Bring the sensor, and I will mount it So far, we have
– a light sensor, that reports if it is light or dark in the Mess (the electronics room)
– a new water level sensor. I didn’t dare mess with the old system, so I am putting in new float sensors

Things can still be developed a lot, and it will be – Suggestions would be happily received.
Thanks and hello to Stephane and Olle that came by to visit us at the sunday meeting, and ended up staying all evening – for help with sensor mounting and JavaScript improvements!

Have a look at this Ship Automation project on [Christian Liljedahl project page] and [Illutron site]

WiFi Enabled Whole House Power Meter

Monday, January 10th, 2011

The Open Hardware web community has made plenty of examples about power monitoring and consumption knowledge: from ladyada’s tweet-a-watt to Jarv’s Home power Monitoring. [Greg] shares code & circuits on his own power monitoring system based on Wifi Communication.

First things first – this project is a blatant and obvious rip-off of John Jarvis’ power monitoring project! A few minor details have changed but I have to give him credit for a great project idea. I was intrigued by John’s power meter and it gave me an excuse to buy and try an Arduino – a handy and fun little embedded project platform! John’s power meter uses the ethernet shield and some CGI scripts, etc., to talk with his server – I went with AsyncLabs WiShield to put my power meter onto the network – my backend to get the data to the server is also a bit different (but of course).

The basic idea of the project is that an Arduino Duemilanove is continuously reading the analog pins that a couple TED Current Tranducers are connected to (one per phase). The Arduino does a little smoothing/averaging of the data and waits for an IP connection to send that data out on. Another machine has a Win32 service running on it and every minute it queries the power meter for its current data; the data that is received is stuffed into a MySQL data base. When a web request comes in to view the data a few pre-canned charts are generated real time and returned to the web user’s browser.

via [SlackLab]

 

Seg..Stick – A Stick-Controlled, Arduino-Based Segway

Sunday, December 26th, 2010

[scolton] made a nice self-balaced vehicle based on two DeWalt cordless drills and an Arduino Nano:

Segstick is a self-balancing…well, literally some kind of broomstick I found in the MITERS workshop. It is powered direct by two DeWalt cordless drills chucked to two 6″ wheels. The controller is an Arduino. Additional supporting devices include an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from Sparkfun and two motor drivers from Pololu .

see the compete how-to on [Instructables]

Arduino Ethernet And The GymArduino Ethernet And the GymArduino Ethernet e La Gestione Della Palestra

Monday, November 15th, 2010

 

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli and Alex Rigamonti have recently finished a server-controlled system to monitor the access of the customers in a gym using a prototype of the Arduino Ethernet, RFID, and digital sensors of a turnstile.

The system was meant to monitor easily the different kind of tickets and timing people may have in a gym. To accomplish that we use a turnstile at the entrance and an RFID reader to authenticate the customer. The RFID reader sends the data to Arduino via serial (TTL). Arduino checks the received data and sends it on a server via ethernet. The server controls and authenticate: ticket, time, day, expiry date and all the credits the customer has. This is the time when the server tells the Arduino to open the turnstile by triggering some relays.

Using the Arduino Ethernet made the all process flexible & cheap: controlling the turnstile, interfacing the RFID and sending the data to a linux server over RJ45.

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli and Alex Rigamonti have recently finished a server-controlled system to monitor the access of the customers in a gym using a prototype of the Arduino Ethernet, RFID, and digital sensors of a turnstile.

The system was meant to monitor easily the different kind of tickets and timing people may have in a gym. To accomplish that we use a turnstile at the entrance and an RFID reader to authenticate the customer. The RFID reader sends the data to Arduino via serial (TTL). Arduino checks the received data and sends it on a server via ethernet. The server controls and authenticate: ticket, time, day, expiry date and all the credits the customer has. This is the time when the server tells the Arduino to open the turnstile by triggering some relays.

Using the Arduino Ethernet made the all process flexible & cheap: controlling the turnstile, interfacing the RFID and sending the data to a linux server over RJ45.

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli ed Alex Rigamonti hanno recentemente portato a termine un progetto molto interessante che aveva come obiettivo il controllo centralizzato degli accessi ad una palestra, via server.

Il sistema è stato ideato per rendere più facile la gestione degli abbonamenti e del flusso in ingresso della palestra. Per far ciò è stato predisposto un tornello all’ingresso del locale con un lettore RFID per effettuare l’autenticazione.

L’utente avvicina la tessera RFID al lettore che a sua volta manda i dati tramite seriale (TTL) ad Arduino. Arduino verifica il dato ricevuto e a sua volta trasmette i dati ad un server tramite ethernet.

Il server effettua il controllo dei dati: esistenza abbonamento associato alla tessera, orario e giorno di accesso consentito, controllo crediti e scadenza dello stesso

A questo punto il server  trasmette  il comando ad Arduino Ethernet per l’apertura del tornello svolta tramite il pilotaggio di relays.

L’utilizzo di Arduino ha reso possibile, con un costo molto contenuto e con un’ottima flessibilità, di interfacciare il tornello, che ha solo ingressi digitali per il comando, ad un server linux tramite la ben nota RJ45.

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Place-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy ConsumptionPlace-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy ConsumptionPlace-stat* Helps You Visualize Your Energy Consumption

Monday, November 8th, 2010

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

 

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

[Gonzalo Garcia-Pelate] is developing Place-stat*, an interesting Arduino-based home-monitoring tool, adding a more intuitive, informal and relational way to visualize data:

People install energy monitors in their homes to become more aware of their consumption, and to improve based on the information the meter provides. To lower energy consumption the key information people want from their meter is whether they are doing better or worse, compared to yesterday, their neighbours, or a national average, for instance. The majority of devices in the smart meter space tend to provide energy consumption data in kW h, sometimes mixed with a trends graph. There is a mismatch between users’ understanding of their energy usage, which is informal and relational, kettle vs. toaster or today vs. yesterday, and the continuous numeric data stream provided and presented by meters. I believe end users can benefit form a different approach, an ambient display which presents information as relationships, to encourage behaviour change.

Here are some pictures of the developing process. Find more info about the early presentation of the project at Pervasive 2010, and the latest Carbon And Energy Hack Weekend event where Gonzalo is actually

[...] interested in discussing additional aspects of the project with others. In particular, energy experts, statisticians, social scientist, product designers, marketers, potential partners, investors. I am also really looking forward to see what others are doing, I’m happy to provide input where I can.

via [makesenseofspace]

 

GardenBot Is Monitoring Your Garden

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

 

Very interesting bottom-up product (but it’s not really a product, it’s more of an experience of nature-lovers and DIYers) do look after your garden:

GardenBot is a garden monitoring system. This means that you put sensors in your garden, and GardenBot will show you charts of the conditions in your garden — so you can see the world the way your plants see it.

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Arduino Mega Based KeyGloveArduino Mega Based KeyGloveArduino Mega Based KeyGlove

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

 

 

The Keyglove is a portable Arduino-powered glove that uses touch combinations to generate keyboard and mouse control codes using only one hand. Once learned, the glove can easily be used without looking, making it perfect for embedded/wearable environments. The glove is thin and light, built to allow other activities (such as writing or driving) without being in the way.

nice MEGA-based project. Have a look at the similar devices page to have a nice compairason of similar project online with different hardware solutions.

via [KeyGlove]

 

 

 

 

Hacked Toy Internet Alert Circuit

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

 

 

Roth Mobot shared a nice project about an “interface between the Internet and a common circuit bent toy.

We decided to create a circuit that would activate a toy whenever someone logged into Roth Mobot’s web site. We designed a simple and elegant solution using an Arduino, a home made Vactrol, a common electronic toy, and three simple scripts written in different programming languages. We’d like to thank William Swyter for lending us his Arduino, and Factory Smoke for his Vactrol suggestion, which stopped us from creating overly-complicated custom circuitry with transistors and diodes, and made the programming a piece of cake. The result was an elegant circuit that electrically insulates the toy from the Arduino (and the computer) by “optically coupling” them with light.

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Open Energy Monitor Keeps Rocking

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

 

Arduinian projects slowly melt with our lives: that’s a kind of challenge that becomes a mission, or – more pragmatically – a way of living. It is the case of the [OpenEnergyMonitor] project.

(more…)

Interactive Architectures: Media-TIC and Interactive Buildings

Friday, September 24th, 2010

 

Some time ago I was informed that the surfaces of the amazing Media-TIC building (from Cloud 9 / Enric Ruiz Geli) were Arduino-based, sensing the enviroment/atmosferic changes and offering a 20% saving on climate control:

The building is in the shape of a cube and formed by large iron beams covered in a plastic coating of inflatable bubbles, which offer glimpses of the fluorescent structure of the building. The attractive covering also has a functional utility as a way of regulating light and temperature, primarily preventing 114 tons of CO2 a year from escaping from the building, and offering a 20% saving on climate control.

Every facade of the Media-TIC is different: from the outside, they reveal parts of their interior spaces and give a diverse plasticity, while from the inside they offer spectacular views.

Importing enviroment data from Arduino to Rhino and other 3D programs has become easier with the creation of [GrassHopper] and its practical toolbar [FireFly].

Firefly for Grasshopper / Arduino from Jason K Johnson on Vimeo.

New ways to conceive our spaces, a new use of energy, the upcoming concept of [active houses] are just around the corner. My question is: how can we get rid of 50 years of  misuse (misunderstanding?) of architecture?

A new age is coming, maybe.

Thanks to [PaoloMartini] [LucaBiselli] [thePlan] see also [GrassHopper3D] [firefly] [Media-TIC]