Archive for the ‘eHome’ Category

Serenading with Arduino

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

This is for the uber-cool geeks who want to specially set up a pre-dinner concert for their loved ones.

Using an SRF05 and an Arduino Uno get that beautiful musical effect with the perfect smile!

Also get the code from Github, plug it in, load the sketch and play!

via [Michele] and [Larry]

The Laundruino Lets You Know When Your Clothes Are Done Over The Net

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

[Micha] has a washing machine with an inaccurate  time data displayed on the front panel. How to solve this?

Since it is located in his basement, he hated having to check on the machine continually to know when his clothes were done. Instead of hauling up and down the stairs over and over, he decided to hack in an “end of cycle” notifier of his own.

The washer has an LED that lights when it is finally done doing its thing, so [Micha] removed the LED and soldered in two wires, which he then connected to his Arduino. When the washer is finished and the LED should be lit, the Arduino senses that the input has been pulled low, signaling the end of the cycle. The Arduino was hooked into his home network via an Ethernet shield, enabling him to monitor the process from the comfort of the nearest web browser.

via [hackAday] source [blog.fsfe]

Arduino-Driven Content-Sensitive TV Mute

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Matt Richardson has a great blog post on Make about using an Arduino to read the closed-captioning stream from a TV using a video experimenters shield, then muting the TV whenever the name of an annoying celebrity is heard. Besides being a great idea, it’s a nicely made explanatory video.  Nice work, Matt!

 

Matt Richardson's TV muter project. Image from makezine.com

 

 

The Roominator Against Conference Room Abuse

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

If your office suffers of  “conference room abuse” you should build your own “roominator” to coordinate it:

Conference Room Abuse is where people 2 or more people randomly grab a conference without any regard to the schedule for the room. Its a problem many companies face.

[Rapleaf] tried to solve this by creating a system to coordinate the (mis)use of room conferences

The hardware consists of two parts: a display unit that’s posted outside of each conference room, and a controller unit that’s located in Rapleaf’s wiring closet. The display unit shows the current and upcoming reservations and an LED status indicator that can tell you from a distance whether a room is “good to grab”. It also has a pair of buttons – one to make an ad-hoc reservation and one to cancel the current reservation. The controller unit interfaces with all the displays to distribute power and data, both of which run over a single standard Cat5e cable. Both the controller and the displays are Arduino-based.

The software component is a Rails web site that allows for configuration and integrates with Google Calendar. Reservations made via Google Calendar are sync’d with the Roominator, and vice-versa. The controller unit polls the web site for the information it should pass to the displays.

Rapleaf  open sourced the code on github, with all the instructions for the set up.

via [Kinlane] source [Rapleaf]

Chilean Teen Twitts About Earthquakes

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

Sebastian Alegria, a 14 years old Chilean teen created an earthquake warning system based on Arduino, an earthquake detector (bought for less 100 $) and an ethernet shield.

Alegria’s rudimentary yet effective system comes from having survived Chile’s own earthquakes last year and seeing the devastation that covered Japan earlier this year. Keen on finding an inexpensive solution for early earthquake detection, he rigged an Arduino and domestic earthquake detector to tweet seconds before detectable seismic activity. Tweeting from @AlarmaSismos, it has already successfully detected every major earthquake that could be felt from Santiago since May. And it’s piling on the Twitter followers.

via [amazonNews] [HackDay] source [InfoBae]

Plantduino Greenhouse Cares Of Your Plants While You’re Away

Monday, July 4th, 2011

Nice step-by-step guide to lets you set up a project that taked care of your field while you’re away:

This summer I wanted to combine my two loves of plant science and engineering. Thus I am constructing my very own greenhouse in my backyard. I am an undergrad, and as any former student knows, this means I move around constantly, and I am not always around to take care of my vegetable garden. I love my plants but since I am moving back to school in July, and my family is unreliable, I need a way to make sure that they are taken care of. Enter Arduino!

I have constructed an automated watering and temperature system. This includes sensors that will turn the systems on only when needed. This is essential when the ever-changing New England weather demands some intelligence in watering and heating patterns.

I want to document this project on Revolt Lab so that anyone who is also in love with vascular (or nonvascular) plants can join me and we can nerd out together! This is my first project using an Arduino so I am using wonderful articles from MAKE and Instructables as very helpful templates. Already the Instructables, MAKE, and Ladyada blogs have been ridiculously helpful so, worry not biology nerds, you too can show the engineers just how awesome we are!

via [instructables] source [RevoltLab]

Plantduino Greenhouse Cares Of Your Plants While You're Away

Monday, July 4th, 2011

Nice step-by-step guide to lets you set up a project that taked care of your field while you’re away:

This summer I wanted to combine my two loves of plant science and engineering. Thus I am constructing my very own greenhouse in my backyard. I am an undergrad, and as any former student knows, this means I move around constantly, and I am not always around to take care of my vegetable garden. I love my plants but since I am moving back to school in July, and my family is unreliable, I need a way to make sure that they are taken care of. Enter Arduino!

I have constructed an automated watering and temperature system. This includes sensors that will turn the systems on only when needed. This is essential when the ever-changing New England weather demands some intelligence in watering and heating patterns.

I want to document this project on Revolt Lab so that anyone who is also in love with vascular (or nonvascular) plants can join me and we can nerd out together! This is my first project using an Arduino so I am using wonderful articles from MAKE and Instructables as very helpful templates. Already the Instructables, MAKE, and Ladyada blogs have been ridiculously helpful so, worry not biology nerds, you too can show the engineers just how awesome we are!

via [instructables] source [RevoltLab]

Yahoo Farm From RoboFun Guys (at Yahoo Open Hack 2011)

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

[Viorel] wrote me about an interesting project he and his friends from Robofun developed during the 2011 Yahoo Open Hack in Bucharest, and won the Hacker’s Choice Award. The diorama becomes a physical representation of tour friends’ behaviours.

If you’re a both nature lover and a geek, you would certainly love the Yahoo Farm. The Yahoo Farm is a 60 cm wide diorama, sitting in your bedroom and bringing you online data from the Yahoo ecosystem.

For example, the wind mill rotation below is directly controlled by the wind speed outside (being connected to the Yahoo Weather API), the hand-painted backgrounds are switched according to the weather state, a new sheep is coming out of the barn each time one of your friends gets online on Yahoo Messenger, and each new email lights up a fruit in the Email Tree.

Give a look at the presentation used for the 90 seconds pitch during the event.

via [Technorama.ro]

Arduino Controlled Dishwasher

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

Arduino Forum User [UnaClocker] shared a cool hack on its Maytag dishwasher:

The control panel on the front of it died, it failed from corrosion getting into the laminated plastic PCB that it’s made up of. Not really repairable, just meant to be replaced, except that it’s a $150 part. From what I could find online, it seems to be a common failure, so why buy an overpriced part that’s just going to fail all over again?This is one of the things I love about the Arduino, it allows me to consider alternatives that I’d have NEVER been able to consider before. If I had to program a controller in assembly, or flat do it with just discrete chips, I’d have never considered this as an option. But with the Arduino, not only can I build my own controller, but it’s almost stupidly simple to do.

via [Arduino Forum] source [NeonSquirt] with Code!

Google Launches Android Open Accessory Development Kit Based On Arduino

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

As seen in the streaming of Google IO 2011, physical computing and interactive enviroments are one of the main topics opening the conference. The Android Open Accessory Kit is going to allow Android related devices receive data from different sensors (just via USB, for now).

The Android Open Accessory Development Kit (ADK) provides an implementation of an Android USB accessory that is based on the Arduino open source electronics prototyping platform, the accessory’s hardware design files, code that implements the accessory’s firmware, and the Android application that interacts with the accessory. The hardware design files and code are contained in the ADK package download.

The board is  based on the Arduino Mega2560 and Circuits@Home USB Host Shield designs, since it communicates to the phone in its “accessory” mode. You can get the custom library / firmware to make it run & test with the shield pictured on top.

more info on the [Android Developer site], via [engadget] source [Google IO]