Archive for the ‘game controllers’ Category

HackVision now available

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

As I read in the Forum, the latest NootropicDesign Product has bees released:

Hackvision is a simple, retro gaming platform based on Arduino technology that you can assemble and connect to your TV. You can write you own games and make your own controllers!

The price goes from $37.95 (kit) to $47.95 (assembled).

Features

  • NO Arduino is required. Based on Arduino technology so you can write your own games and upload them using the Arduino IDE. All you need is a USB to TTL serial cable or adapter.
  • Connects directly to your TV with standard RCA connections. One for audio, one for video. Works with NTSC or PAL (Europe, Africa, Asia, South America) TVs.
  • Integrated button controller right on the PCB.
  • Preloaded with awesome Space Invaders and Pong games. More games coming. You can write them, too!
  • Other controllers supported: Wii nunchuk, SuperNES, or paddle controllers you can make from a potentiometer and button. Or invent your own.
  • Software libraries for game development and controller support.
  • High score files stored in EEPROM so they are retained even with power off.
  • All unused pins broken out to pads for your hacking pleasure.
  • Non-conductive adhesive foam pad protects the bottom of the board from your fingers.
  • All through-hole components. Kit can be assembled in 30-45 min. Fully assembled and tested units will also be available.
  • Additional accessories available in the nootropic design store including 9V adapters, RCA cables, Wii nunchuk breakout boards, paddle controller kits, USB-serial adapters, etc.
  • Makes a great gift!

Technical Specs

  • ATmega328 microcontroller with Arduino bootloader
  • Monochrome video
  • Resolution is 136×96 pixels (You can control this in your own games)
  • Requires 9V power supply with center-positive 2.1mm barrel plug

via [nootropicDesign]

BMW Instrument Cluster on PC via USB application Arduino MEGA board

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

Here one of the more realistic car interfaces I’ve ever seen. But let’s start from what [hrsim] posted some time ago:

Browsing around the www, I came across this simple, easy to use development board, which seemed just right for my project. As I’ve said in an earlier post, I want to reduce my efforts as much as possible, so this Arduino MEGA board was just what I was looking for, as it is built around a powerful enough microcontroller, the ATMega1280, it exposes all I/O pins (analog, digital, PWM etc), and has a simple, open-source programming language, as well as a pretty bare IDE which also allows you to upload the software via USB.

The blog is an amazing worklog of a big physical game interface. Some tips about the programming side:

Both the Arduino and the PC side software are now updated to process the speed and RPM signals coming from Live For Speed.

What’s interesting, is that the Arduino (ATMega1280) being single-theaded, I had to write all the code in one function. So, there is only one thread which reads data from the serial port, and as soon as a complete package is received, it updates the control lights and speed / RPM signals.
The speedometer and rev counter are fed with clock signals, whose frequencies vary according to the speed / RPM to be displayed on the dial (the actual speed and RPM sensors on the real car read their values from the rotating wheels/engine crankshaft, thus sending clock-like signals to the instrument cluster). These signals are generated by means of two dedicated timers, also implemented in the same single thread.

some more videos.

via [microcontroller] source [hrsim]

BMW Instrument Cluster on PC via USB application Arduino MEGA board

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

Here one of the more realistic car interfaces I’ve ever seen. But let’s start from what [hrsim] posted some time ago:

Browsing around the www, I came across this simple, easy to use development board, which seemed just right for my project. As I’ve said in an earlier post, I want to reduce my efforts as much as possible, so this Arduino MEGA board was just what I was looking for, as it is built around a powerful enough microcontroller, the ATMega1280, it exposes all I/O pins (analog, digital, PWM etc), and has a simple, open-source programming language, as well as a pretty bare IDE which also allows you to upload the software via USB.

The blog is an amazing worklog of a big physical game interface. Some tips about the programming side:

Both the Arduino and the PC side software are now updated to process the speed and RPM signals coming from Live For Speed.

What’s interesting, is that the Arduino (ATMega1280) being single-theaded, I had to write all the code in one function. So, there is only one thread which reads data from the serial port, and as soon as a complete package is received, it updates the control lights and speed / RPM signals.
The speedometer and rev counter are fed with clock signals, whose frequencies vary according to the speed / RPM to be displayed on the dial (the actual speed and RPM sensors on the real car read their values from the rotating wheels/engine crankshaft, thus sending clock-like signals to the instrument cluster). These signals are generated by means of two dedicated timers, also implemented in the same single thread.

some more videos.

via [microcontroller] source [hrsim]

Android using NES controller from Android and Bluesmirf (Bluetooth)

Monday, September 13th, 2010

 

 

In this video [sketchsk3tch] youtube user plays Super Mario on a HTC EVO, using a NES controller.

This is a project I did using an Arduino and a Bluesmirf bluetooth module so I could control my NES emulator on my EVO with an NES controller.

more info after the break

(more…)

Wiimote light-follower with servo

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

Everybody is familiar with the infamous Wiimote. When I look at it, I think about all the useful sensors/gadgets that this little 40$ package (new) comes with. Recently I’ve been playing with the IR Camera (It’s really just a light sensing camera with an IR Filter).This particular camera is a standalone module that outputs coordinates of the 4 brightest “images”, all via I2C communication.

read the full post

(more…)

ATmega 328 based Video Game Project developed in Honduras

Tuesday, April 13th, 2010

[Luis] created this game he built using an ATmega 328 microcontroller.

His game is the first video-game system made in Honduras (as he lives there). The news was spread from several local newspapers or TV programs.

“This is a monochrome game with monaural sound I created using an atmega328. The circuit has 3 MCUs (One for composite video, the IR receiver de-codifier, and the last one for sound) and 3 LEDs (R-G-B LEDs) that turn on depending on some events of the game.

The controller has an atmega168, an infrared light emitter diode that transmits the signal to the game, and also uses an Memsic 2125 accelerometer.”

Via  [trickFist] [intelSath]

Control your DSLR with a Nintendo DS

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

Techincally, this is one of the reason Arduino was created: helping prototype new users interfaces; openSource.

Here’s the Nintendo DS DSLR Trigger. Arduino Based (or, at least programmed. It’s based on Atmega 168) + Open Source Applications on Ninetndo DS.

via [MAKE] [OpenCameraControl]

Super Mario Brothers with an Arduino

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

Super Mario Bros on an 8×8 LED matrix from Chloe Fan on Vimeo.

Definetly one of the more interesting “post-vintage” things I have seen around.  Chloe Fan,  a stundent from Carnegie Mellon University practice her knowledge of Arduino and Microcontrollers in this Super Mario related game (I created a simple version of Super Mario Bros using an 8×8 LED matrix (one color), an Arduino Nano, two buttons for the input (forward and jump), and a piezo sensor hooked to a separate Arduino for the theme song.)

Checkout the Vimeo link for code & list of hardware.

And please don’t miss the first comment from Box thor.

via [Vimeo and Make]

PS3 SixAxis hack

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010


nice PS3 SixAxis hack via Hackzine.

Via [MAKE]

Arduino goes to Unity = Power Glove 20th Anniversary Edition

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

Matt Mechtley has managed to port NES Power Glove to Unity, one of the major game development tools. Obliosly using Arudino. here’s the instuctable

Vvvvvvvvvvvvintage!

via [LearnUnity3D]

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