Archive for the ‘Audio’ Category

Arduino Circuit Bending Workshop in Torino

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Il prossimo week-end a Torino si terrà un workshop gratuito di Arduino (un kit opzionale potrà essere comprato per partecipare qualora non disponeste dei materiali elencati) sul circuit bending e la generazione di suoni con la scheda.

Un workshop di tre giorni per smontare riciclare e far suonare vecchi strumenti elettronici, creare una digital toys orchesta e sfilare in parata a Paratissima.

Il circuit Bending è una pratica molto diffusa tra gli sperimentatori musicali. Soprattutto sulla scena della musica elettronica sono sempre più frequenti gli artisti che si creano controller o addirittura strumenti musicali personalizzati.

Nel workshop saranno coinvolte diverse discipline: toy hacking, riciclo elettronico, elettronica di base, sintesi sonora, programmazione ad oggetti e faremo largo uso di Arduino per comandare i nuovi strumenti.

Il workshop è gratuito, a carico dei partecipanti il costo dei materiali e l’acquisto del kit-workshop.
maggiori informazioni quì!

Per partecipare registrati qui.

via [FablabItalia]

Ball of Dub Keeps Audio in Your Hands

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Ball of Dub from LUSTlab on Vimeo.

Accelerometer to Renoise via OSC  to control trippy and dubby sounds.

[Lizzie] from LustLab sent in her Ball of Dub that turns a few accelerometer and a digital audio workstation and turns everything into an aural experience of wubs and dubs. The Ball of Dub can turn just about anything into dubstep, and does so with a fairly interesting user interface.

There isn’t a build log for the Ball of Dub, but  the folks at LustLab did send in a basic overview of her project. Inside the ball, there’s a Razor IMU from Sparkfun that is attached to the ever-popular XBee wireless transceiver. A tiny program on an Arduino calibrates the gyroscope and accelerometer and sends that data to the DAW at 50Hz.

The host computer is running Renoise, a very popular tracker that can accept MIDI and OSC input. A Processing app parses the ball spin, free fall and impact, averages them over a period of time, and pipes that into the OSC input of Renoise. In [Lizzie]‘s video, the ball spin is sent to a low-pass filter on the baseline track, and the average impact is applied to the vocal track.

via [HackADay] source [LustLab Tumblr] special demo video for the few skeptical comments on HackADay

Remix Domestic Appliances

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

[Elvia Vasconcelos] developed a very simple yet interesting installation based on PureData and Arduino. The main goal is change / remix (and therefore innovate) the approach toward domestic appliances:

To re-purpose an object is to manipulate its construction. I believe there is nothing natural about the way objects behave and therefore in their potential to be reinvented. It is in the artistic domain to liberate these objects from the settings in which they have become predictable and accepted. For this installation I am looking at objects from the Home. I present a fan, an extractor, a light bulb and a vacuum cleaner that are pretending to be toasters. They are controlled by the viewer via a telephone. My work is guided by a desire to hold onto things but not exactly to hold them in place.

via [PSFK]

Arduino ADK spices up phones

Friday, September 9th, 2011

 

What better option than Android arduino, could be used when we think of hacking phones and and interfacing them with the sensors?

As a member of illutron, Mads Høbye – MEDEA PhD student in interaction design – was asked by SonyEricsson to challenge the more conventional usage of mobile technology, by exploring alternative usage scenarios. He called in a combination of artists, geeks and tinkerers for a four day workshop.

 

The Android platform proved to be a great stepping stone in that direction. During the workshop we managed to use the phones in multiple ways, by taking advantage of the embedded technologies like GPS, Compass, Wifi, GSM/3, Accelerometers, touch screen and connecting them to the Arduino platform.The compressed format of the workshop proved to a fruitful for revealing new openings and possibilities – pushing the boundaries of the normal perception of what constitutes a phone and how it should be used. From a research-through-design perspective, the resulting prototypes work as conversation pieces around what constitutes material media and how we can design position aware devices that are constantly connected to each other.

 

Via:[Medea]

Listening To The Walls’ Whispers

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

[Pierre] shares an interesting geo-localization project of sound, narration and  culture,  made in  ”plan d’Aou”, a district of Marseilles – France. The project dates back in September 2010, within the framework of the Smala project in order to trace a sound cartography of Islam in the city of Marseilles: the guys at [Echelle Inconnue] took their time to fully document the all project with schematics, codes, fritzing diagrams and so on.

Several mobile systems were distributed to the people to accompany their walk across the district with, by hand, a kind of speaker to be press on the walls which makes it possible to listen to the sound by vibrating the material of the wall.

The materials of urban furniture or buildings become the speakers required for sound diffusion. Each resonant body had its acoustic specificities, the words take shape in metal, wood or glass… Textures of the sound fluctuate from a surface to another and the listener must juggle with these characteristics to obtain a quality of optimal listening, between documentary in the walls and poetic sound creation.

source [echelleinconnue]

When music meets Arduino

Monday, August 29th, 2011

A beautiful project by [Leigh Davis]. It is a brilliant proof of how Arduino fits into virtually any sphere of thought and is the shortest path for a creator realizing his idea in reality.

He writes:

I began the first few days by developing a stand alone application build in MaxMSP that understands the notes that a play on my (recently purchased second-hand) flute. I set the range from low C right up to the 3rd octave D. Each note of the chromatic scale triggers a bang, which is coloured uniquely to the other notes bang messages.

The bang message then sets the corresponding color to the display screen on the application. Which will in turn send a signal to the arduino to dispense the corresponding oil color on water according to the different notes. (Something like a physical Milkdrop!)He further plans to control different LEDs, motors and the likes using the Rayne application.

Steampunk Record Player with Arduino

Friday, August 5th, 2011

A steam-powered record turntable made out of juck & re-used things.

This was made with small steam engine with a boiler crafted from a copper water pipe and carved some wood for the custom platter and base. Add some magnets, a coil for a pickup and a servo that is controlled by Arduino.

via [hacklog] source [asciimation]

 

Radio Arduino

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

Nice Oscar Belle Two Band Transistor Radio (1960s) hacked with Arduino.

What it is really doing is playing 24 music tracks that I preloaded onto an SD card in WAV format. There are also 10 tuning noises tracks that get played when the tuner is turned.

Because this is the first time I did this I had a lot of help. Firstly the chaps and chapesses at Hackspace have been very supportive in teaching me how to use and Arduino, particularly Adrian McEwan and Oomlout. Also Jingle Joe who supervised my soldering of the Wave Shield, Brox who helped me decipher the ancient mysteries of FAT16 and Esme who helped dismantle the original radio… PS I did do some of it myself!

via [MycroftMilverton]

A Wall of 250 Canon Cameras Flashing Their Lights In A Matrix

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011

Japanese band Androp realized for it’s latest single “Bright Siren” a 250 Flash light-based interactive Matrix.

Japan musicians Androp built a backdrop of 250 Canon cameras and programmed all their flashes to fire off in a sort of digital stop-motion screen.

The “Making of” after the break.

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Vibratron Robot Plays Out Midi As Steel Balls

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

As part of the National Robotics Week coverage of iheartrobotics, the Vibratron:

[...]the newest member of the RobOrchestra. This amazing musician was built by club members with a total budget of $1000. The Vibratron uses an Arduino Mega to control 30 individual solenoid gates which drop steel balls onto the vibration keys. Using the Arduino Mega they were able to avoid complications with multiplexing I/O lines. Notes are read in using a MIDI shield to receive standard MIDI signals from a sequencer or keyboard. The balls are recirculated using an Archimedes screw to raise them to the bucket at the top.

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