Archive for the ‘TRE’ Category

See you at Maker Faire Bay Area! 17th and 18th of May

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

MakerfaireBayarea

Today and tomorrow you visit us at the Arduino booth (#204) right next to Atmel booth (#205) and have a look at our cool demos. You’ll find all the new boards: Arduino TRE Development Edition and Arduino ZERO, Arduino Yún together with Temboo and the freshly baked Arduino at Heart littleBits Module!

Massimo Banzi keynote is scheduled at 4.00PM and Michael Shiloh’s Getting Started with Arduino talks are waiting for you 2 times a day. (more…)

Arduino TRE Dev. Edition is now available! Join us in the Beta Testing Program

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

ArduinoTRE-DE

We are excited to announce that starting today a limited batch of 50 Arduino TRE Developer Edition boards is  available in the Arduino Store.

The Arduino TRE Developer Edition (see other pics) is a pre-production board. Its release kicks off our redesigned Beta Testing Program: anyone in the community who purchases the board will be able to give us feedback and suggestions in a new, direct way.

After buying the board you’ll receive an invitation to join the beta-testing program, as a beta-tester you will be able to contribute to the development of the board by signing up for tasks and projects. You’ll be working alongside the Arduino and BeagleBoard.org teams on tasks such as writing examples, testing libraries and external hardware, and making projects. Completed tasks will be rewarded with a special program of benefits, including the possibility of featuring your project on the Arduino blog and receiving a coupon for the same value of the TRE Developer Edition you purchased. We will be beta-testing the board for about three months. (more…)

Open source matters in hardware, too – Interview

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

Arduino TRE

(Article originally published on Ars Technica)

Jon Brodkin of Ars Technica conducts a Q&A with Massimo Banzi as Arduino’s rise continues.

Most of the technology world is familiar with open source software and the reasons why, in some eyes, it’s more appealing than proprietary software. When software’s source code is available for anyone to inspect, it can be examined for security flaws, altered to suit user wishes, or used as the basis for a new product.

Less well-known is the concept behind open source hardware, such as Arduino. Massimo Banzi, co-creator of Arduino, spoke with Ars this month about the importance of open hardware and a variety of other topics related to Arduino. As an “open source electronic prototyping platform,” Arduino releases all of its hardware design files under a Creative Commons license, and the software needed to run Arduino systems is released under an open source software license. That includes an Arduino development environment that helps users create robots or any other sort of electronics project they can dream up.

So just like with open source software, people can and do make derivatives of Arduino boards or entirely new products powered by Arduino technology.

Why is openness important in hardware? “Because open hardware platforms become the platform where people start to develop their own products,” Banzi told Ars. “For us, it’s important that people can prototype on the BeagleBone [a similar product] or the Arduino, and if they decide to make a product out of it, they can go and buy the processors and use our design as a starting point and make their own product out of it.”

(more…)

A sneak preview of Arduino TRE powered by Texas Instruments

Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

Arduino TRE

Next saturday  5th of October Massimo Banzi with Jason Kridner and Gerald Coley (Texas Instrument) will talk about the new collaboration on Arduino TRE during a talk at Maker Faire Rome ( from 15.30 in Room G – Archimede).

Arduino TRE, based on the Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x ARM Cortex-A8 processor is the “most powerful Arduino to date” and the first that will be able to run “full Linux.”

Thanks to the 1-GHz Sitara AM335x processor, Arduino developers get up to 100 times more performance with the Sitara-processor-based TRE than they do on the Arduino Leonardo or Uno. This performance opens the doors to more advanced Linux-powered applications. The Sitara-processor-based Linux Arduino can run high-performance desktop applications, processing-intensive algorithms or high-speed communications.

The Arduino TRE is two Arduinos in one: the Sitara-processor-based Linux Arduino plus a full AVR-based Arduino, while leveraging the simplicity of the Arduino software experience. The integration of the AVR Arduino enables the Arduino TRE to use the existing shield ecosystem so that innovators can expand the Arduino TRE to develop a wide range of high-performance applications such as 3D printers, gateways for building automation and lighting automation, telemetry hubs that collect data from nearby sensors wirelessly, and other connected applications that require host control plus real-time operations.  (more…)