Archive for the ‘arduino’ Category

Play with the Basketball Robot running on Intel Edison

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

basketball_intel1

After you had an introduction to Intel Edison  following the Getting Started guide, and our previous tutorial, the Intel Edison mini-breakout Getting Started Guide, it’s now time to work on something a bit more complex. You’ll be also able to play a bit with Node.js,  a programming platform that runs on javascript and a good choice for building a web-based application. It is supported by the Intel® Edison standard system image so you can run node.js scripts directly on it.

He shoots! He scores! The crowd goes wild! Let’s build a robot that plays basketball with you. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide for a simple and small differential-drive robot that uses the Intel Edison. You’ll get to know a few more tricks on how to use Mini Breakout Kit and set up a node.js server for the communication.

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Having fun with music in a science class

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

corea4

A science teacher at Bundang management high school, 20 kilometers southeast of downtown Seoul (South Korea) involved his students in an Arduino Music project running on Arduino Uno, Sparkfun Music Instrument Shield and Makey Makey.

Students started studying the principles of sensors and then built their own music instruments using recycled materials. Finally they played them as you can see from the video he shared with us: (more…)

An open hardware quartz crystal microbalance

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

openQCM

Marco Mauro is a physicist currently employed as Scientific Coordinator at Novaetech, the first Spin-off Company of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) in Italy. He shared with us all the info about a project he’s been working on  and based on Arduino Micro.

OpenQCM is a fully open source scientific microbalance capable of weighing mass deposition down to 1 billionth of gram: (more…)

It’s about us: meet the people working at Arduino

Friday, March 20th, 2015

AboutUs

Today we are adding to Arduino website a new important page. It’s called About Us and presents all the people working at Arduino, side by side with the Arduino founders, from different locations around the world.

Our big team, with its multifaceted skillset, takes care of the complexity of an open-source hardware project like Arduino, made by the Hardware, the Software, the Design of all the artifacts and the user experience, the coordination of these activities by the Management, and of course the work with its Community of volunteers and enthusiasts.

This almost invisible works helps Arduino thrive and hopefully makes it easier for you to learn electronics and have fun!

Come meet us on March 28th in all the official locations of Arduino Day!

 

What if kids could hack a ball? (Prototyped with Arduino!)

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

hackball

Hackaball is a smart and responsive ball that children can program to invent and play games. It was recently backed by more than 1000 people and reached the goal!

As many other projects on Kickstarter, Hackaball was initially prototyped with Arduino using sensors that detect motions like being dropped, bounced, kicked, shaken or being perfectly still.

hackball2
We got in touch with its team and asked them to tell us a bit more about the creation process:

Our early versions of the ball worked with the Arduino Uno board, progressing to a breadboard Arduino and then making our own SMD designs with the Uno. In the latests prototypes we used the Arduino Leonardo and our current version runs on the Arduino Mega. Our production version will run on an ARM chip.

We hope to offer Arduino Compatibility as one of our stretch goals in the Kickstarter, so that people can buy a board and put their own code on it using the Arduino software, effectively moving one step up from the app in terms of hacking the ball and making it do what you want it to do. We also believe many adults would love an interactive ball that they can control and design their own interactions – its packed full of features! Hopefully it will also allow kids who’ve outgrown our app to experiment with our technology in a more challenging way, bringing longevity to the product.

We’ve approached the kids who’ll play with Hackaball as the future Makers. The idea of hacking and getting close to technology starts with how the ball first arrives in your home. Kids open the packaging to find the ball is broken: Hackaball has crash-landed on earth and needs to be put back together again. After their first achievement, making the ball, kids are challenged to play games, change existing ones, fix broken games and create new ones from scratch.

We specifically designed the ball and packaging to be gender neutral – making it feel accessible to both boys and girls from the very beginning. We also expanded on the ability of the ball to include both hard and soft skills – from the tactile and linear computational thinking, to the storytelling and imagination-driven game creation, teaching a new generation of Makers to combine technology and creativity. We think that the kids who play with Hackaball would move on to Arduino in their teens!

 

You still have some days to back the project and help them reach the stretch goals, making Hackaball even more hackable!

Bruce Sterling interviews Massimo Banzi on Casa Jasmina and more!

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

banzi-bruce

During the first opening of Casa Jasmina, Bruce Sterling found a moment to discuss about IoT, Casa Jasmina and Arduino future plans with Massimo Banzi. Check out this exclusive video where two of the minds behind the Casa Jasmina project dialogue about the future: (more…)

Getting Started with Intel Edison Mini Breakout Board

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Tutorial_intel2

Let’s start exploring a bit more about Intel Edison. As you may already know, Intel provides 2 different hardware platforms to work with Edison development board: the core module is called Intel Edison Compute Module, while the 2 extension boards are called Intel Edison Arduino Board and Intel Edison Breakout Board respectively. We refer to them as the Arduino module and mini-breakout board, respectively. The tutorial of this week is called Getting Started with Intel Edison Mini Breakout Board: (more…)

Build Arduino-based IoT apps with Temboo Conditions features

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

conditions-temboo

Last week Temboo just added new Conditions features to its IoT Mode interface, making it even easier to connect your Arduino to the Internet of Things! Now, the functionality of Temboo’s Device Coder has been extended to all 2000+ Choreos in the Temboo Library, meaning that data collected from sensors attached to an Arduino Yún can be used to trigger any cloud process, and responses from the cloud can be used to trigger all sorts of hardware actions on your board. (more…)

Every word is like an unnecessary stain on silence

Monday, March 9th, 2015

X OBRAS

« Every word is like an unnecessary stain on silence and nothingness » is a sentence from Samuel Beckett but also the title of Eugenio Ampudia’s last artwork created and installed with the support of Ultra-lab  and running on Arduino Mega and GSM Shield: (more…)

Encrypting messages with Cuckoo and Arduino Yún

Saturday, March 7th, 2015

cuckoo

Jochen Maria Weber is a Researcher and Designer at the intersection of Interaction- and Industrial Design. He shared with us Project Cuckoo, a project running on Arduino Yún and looking at our interactions with intercepted social networks and how alternative ways of communicating might change them: (more…)

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