Archive for the ‘Micro’ Category

GPS Powered LED Speedometer #ArduinoMicroMonday

Monday, February 10th, 2014

Adafruit + Arduino Micro and GPS powered LED Speedometer v1.0 by xykobas3rd on Instagram:

speedometer

An Interactive Musical Art Installation for kids #ArduinoMicroMonday

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

reach installation

The weekly post on the Arduino Micro,  made in collaboration with Adafruit, is dedicated to an installation for kids made by Scott Garner, a designer, developer and craftsman:

Reach is a large-scale interactive mural and musical instrument created for the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh as part of the Tough Art residency program. There are no visible electronics, but when users touch both the moon and a star (either alone or by holding hands with others) a tone is played.

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LED Matrix Clock Project #ArduinoMicroMonday

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Martin_Atkins Matrix

Martin Atkins built this great LED matrix clock using an Arduino Microa few bicolor LED matrix displaysdisplay drivers, and a real time clock module Chronodot:

Finally found some time today to solder the parts onto my first OSH Park PCB. The primary motivation for this was to learn Eagle and try out OSH Park, so I wanted to make something with only components I’d already purchased, and that’s why it has a whole Arduino Micro attached to it even though a smaller board (or even just a lone microcontroller) would’ve been sufficient. I didn’t get the displays lined up quite right, so there’s a small gap between them that looks obvious in this photo but isn’t so bad if you’re further away and looking at it head-on. But my learning for next time is to watch out for the positioning of odd-sized components.

Stunning Halo 3 Costumes and Energy Sword #ArduinoMicroMonday

Monday, January 20th, 2014

halo

 

Adafruit Forum member JoshuaKane writes:

I wanted to share with everyone a project I worked on for a recent sci-fi/comic convention. I have always been a fan of fantasy, sci-fi and comics. A few months ago I started working on an Orbital Drop Shock Trooper (ODST) costume and weapon.

I wanted to make the sword something that would literally make folks stop in their tracks and take notice at a convention. For this I turned to the Arduino Microprocessor and some of the accessories developed at Adafruit.

The full idea is to give the impression of a pulsing energy sword. The perfect item to light this sword are the NeoPixel strips (60 LEDs per meter). The complete package is a sword that would light up when you turned it on, and play a sound indicating that it was switched on.…think Star Wars light saber. Once lit the NeoPixels would pulse from blue to purple to red, and back to blue. What weapon would be complete without sounds? To give the sword a more realistic look and sound we used the ADXL345 to be able to detect motion, this would trigger a sound event via the VS1053 breakout.

To complete the package I used 2x liPo 2600mAh batteries hooked in parallel through a UBEC to give a constant and clean 5v for the LED’s and controller.

The costume is designed by Sean Bradley, who also molded the sword parts out of PET Plastic and Resin. DragonCon photos were provided by Brian Humphrey.

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An ultrasonic eye for the visually impaired – #ArduinoMicroMonday

Monday, January 13th, 2014

netra

Dhavalis  lives in Surat (India) and grew up watching Sci-Fi and Super Hero Movies which made him believe that technology can overcome human weaknesses.  He wrote us to share Netra (it  means “eye” in Sanskrit), a project done during his second year of undergraduate engineering studies:

Netra is an eye for visually impaired, a device based on Echolocation principle. It uses Arduino Micro, Ultrasonic sensor and vibrating motor. Vibration of the motor increases with decrease in distance and vibration decreases with increase in distance between device and object in front. Build this device for people suffering from Retinitis Pigmentosa Disorder.

Take a look at the schematic and the code on his website.

Netra

 

 

Simple Arduino Micro GPS Clock Project #ArduinoMicroMonday

Monday, January 6th, 2014

GPS Arduino Micro

Today we start a series of posts in collaboration with Adafruit and focused on Arduino Micro –  every monday follow the hashtag #ArduinoMicroMonday 

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Jay put together a nice little video of a GPS clock he built using an Arduino Micro, an Adafruit Ultimate GPS module, and an Adafruit 4-Digit 7-Segment LED Display.

I’ve posted a new video of the small GPS clock project I have been working on this past week.  It’s pretty easy to do, and only needs soldering on the GPS and LED units.  You can mount everything to a breadboard, so you don’t need to commit the parts to the project permanently.

Check the video below and his post:

Arduino Micro in collaboration with Adafruit
Arduino Micro board – Based on the technology behind the Leonardo board, its main feature is the very small size.

The Arduino Micro packs all of the power of the Arduino Leonardo in a 48mm x 18mm module (1.9? x 0.7?).

It makes it easier for makers to embed the Arduino technology inside their projects by providing a small and convenient module that can be either used on a breadboard or soldered to a custom designed PCB.

The Micro has been developed in collaboration with Adafruit Industries, one of the leaders of the Maker movement. Adafruit is already developing a series of accessories for the new board that will complement its power and simplicity.

 

Pokemon X and Y: a Fully Automatic Shiny Finder made with Arduino Micro

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

Pokemon Nintendo

How to enhance performance in gaming from an engineering point of view? dekuNukem created a hands-free finder  built using Arduino Micro to accomplish the task of chaining fishes at full speed and without fail at a touch of a button:

The fishing keeps going without human input until a shiny shows up, at which point it stops and sound a buzzer to notify the user.

It took 81 chains to catch a shiny in this case, but during my other tests it’s usually around 50, and sometimes even less than 20 chains get you one.

Watch the detailed video below and check the code: