Archive for the ‘Leonardo’ Category

Follow your cat with FPV camera and Arduino Leonardo

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

fpvCamera

After the Bike Tachometer we posted back in September, Nikus  shared with us a new Instructable to show you how to build remote-controlled tank using a first person view (FPV) camera and Arduino Leonardo: (more…)

A bike tachometer measuring more than just speed

Monday, September 8th, 2014

diytachometer

Nikodem is a young maker  based in Poland and shared with us his latest project based on Arduino Leonardo. It’s a DIY bike tachometer providing you with a set of additional information:

It shows your speed, the average speed, the temperature, the trip time and the total distance. You can change it using the button. Additionally, the speed is shown on a tachometer. I built it because I like building new things, I have not found anything like this on the internet so I want to show you how to build a good speedometer as the one on my bike is not as cool as I want :) .

(more…)

Music and language skills get a boost with Toot

Monday, September 1st, 2014

toot02

Toot is an interactive and sound-active toy designed for children aged between 3 and 6 years old that wants to enhance their auditory, music and language skills. It was developed by Federico Lameri as his thesis project of Master of Interaction Design at Supsi and prototyped using Arduino Leonardo. (more…)

Let your Arduino talk with your Android

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Annikken

Annikken Andee is a Bluetooth Arduino shield, currently on an Indiegogo campaign, that let  Arduino communicate with  Android device without writing Android code.

With the growing popularity of smart phones in this time and era it’s interesting to explore how Arduino could tap on the strength of smart phones – touch screen capability and smart phone capability. However for the integration to work, one has to develop the corresponding Smart phone app to handle the bluetooth communication and provide a stable GUI on the screen.

Therefore to make things easier for Arduino developers who wish to tap on the power on smartphone, the Singapore-based team came up Annikken Andee project, an Arduino shield, with supporting resources, that performs primarily the following actions:

  • handles the communication between Android and Arduino
  • GUI creation on smartphone by coding on Arduino. Requires no Smartphone App programming
  • accesses to Smartphone functions from Arduino Library
  • provides larger, portable and non-volatile storage

The shield communicates with Arduino via the ICSP header (SPI) and pin 8. An SD card Reader is available for external data storage for Arduino –  for huge data storage or extended period of data logging activity by Arduino. As Android has yet to support for Bluetooth 4.0/BLE, they are using bluetooth 2.1 module WT11i by Bluegiga for communicating with the Android phone. Currently the shield supports Arduino Uno, Mega and Leonardo.

Robin, part of the Team Annikken Ande, wrote us:

With Andee, Arduino user can program the UI on their Android phone by downloading the Andee Arduino Library onto their Arduino IDE and the Andee Android App into their Android phone from google play store. Using the functions in the Arduino library, user can easily design the UI on the Andee Android App without touching Android programming.

As we hope to spread the news of this invention to as many people as possible, we believe that arduino.cc is the perfect place to help us make this work.

 

 

 

Two Arduino-based Kickstarter projects worth a look

Monday, May 20th, 2013

SmartCitizen kit
Some weeks ago I read an article on the New York Times talking about Kickstarter. The author was exploring the logic of the platform and especially in which way backers shouldn’t really be considered like investors. They aren’t because their main aim is not looking for the project that will give them the greatest return on their money.

Kickstarter as a phenomenon is made much more comprehensible once you realize that it’s not following the logic of the free market; it’s following the logic of the gift […] People contribute to them because they’re friends who know the artist personally; they’re fans engaged in a highly personal if unidirectional relationship with the artist [creator]; or simply because they’re intrigued by the project and want some sense of participation in it.

Here we are then, highlighting  two Arduino-based projects because we are intrigued by them and hope you like them too.

(more…)

The joystick that changed a life and could help many more

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

joystick

Robert Book is a tinkerer by nature and works at Silicon Valley Bank with Ian McCutcheon, a geek by nature. One day they were talking and Robert shared his big problem: his son Jerry, who suffers from Muscular Dystrophy, couldn’t use a keyboard anymore but loved to play computer games. Jerry could only be able to use a mouse with his right hand and very limited abilities in his left.

After a chat they realized that if they put their heads together they could make something that might enable him to play the different computer games with more ease and enjoyment.
Ian knew that Arduino Leonardo has a great capability, it can emulate a keyboard and a mouse and soon they came up with the first release of an augmented joystick making Jerry much happier. This collaboration became a great story  you can watch in the video below and it’s going to make even more people happy thanks to the shared code to build the joystick yourself.

 

How to make something like “Makey Makey” using Arduino

Saturday, March 23rd, 2013

Makey Makey with Arduino

Many people asked Alpesh Vitha how to create something like Makey Makey using Arduino and he created this cool video, together with Mowgli, to share with all of us how to use an Arduino Leonardo to accomplish the task. He lives in Kolkata and  runs a company called “Inventify” to popularize Arduino and science in Indian schools especially those with less resources. Enjoy the video tutorial !

 

 

 

How to make something like "Makey Makey" using Arduino

Saturday, March 23rd, 2013

Makey Makey with Arduino

Many people asked Alpesh Vitha how to create something like Makey Makey using Arduino and he created this cool video, together with Mowgli, to share with all of us how to use an Arduino Leonardo to accomplish the task. He lives in Kolkata and  runs a company called “Inventify” to popularize Arduino and science in Indian schools especially those with less resources. Enjoy the video tutorial !

 

 

 

Bleuette, the hexapod robot

Monday, March 18th, 2013

bleuette hexapod robot

Bleuette project is hexapod robot equipped with 6 legs that can be operated without any external guidance.

The french project is fully open hardware (made entirely with  an Ultimaker 3D printer) / opensource and operates on a Arduino Leonardo board with a custom shield developed for it and available on Hugo’s website, the author of the project. It is used mostly to control the 12 servos (+ 2 optional) for the legs, measure voltage and current.

Take a look at the robot’s first steps!

 

Hugo is also thinking about future developments for Bleuette, like equipping it with a Bluetooth connection, a magnetic sensor to keep an edge when walking and finally a mobile turret with an ultrasonic sensor to detect obstacles in front of it.

Interested in the code? you can find it on Github:

New Arduino Micro available

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

We’re happy to announce the release of the new Arduino Micro board.

The Arduino Micro packs all of the power of the Arduino Leonardo in a 48mm x 18mm module (1.9? x 0.7?).

It makes it easier for makers to embed the Arduino technology inside their projects by providing a small and convenient module that can be either used on a breadboard or soldered to a custom designed PCB.

The Micro has been developed in collaboration with Adafruit Industries, one of the leaders of the Maker movement. Adafruit is already developing a series of accessories for the new board that will complement its power and simplicity.

Throughout the month of November the product is available exclusively from Adafruit online and Radio Shack in retail stores.

Main features of Arduino Micro:

  • The Arduino Micro is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega32u4.
  • Like its brother the Leonardo board, the Arduino Micro has one microcontroller with built-in USB. Using the ATmega32U4 as its sole microcontroller allows it to be cheaper and simpler. Also, because the 32U4 is handling the USB directly, code libraries are available which allow the board to emulate a computer keyboard, mouse, and more using the USB-HID protocol.
  • It has 20 digital input/output pins (of which 7 can be used as PWM outputs and 12 as analog inputs), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a micro USB cable to get started.
  • This allows the Micro to appear to a connected computer as a mouse and keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC) serial / COM port.

Technical specifications:

  • Microcontroller: ATmega32u4
  • Operating Voltage: 5V
  • Input Voltage (recommended): 7-12V
  • Input Voltage (limits): 6-20V
  • Digital I/O Pins: 20
  • PWM Channels: 7
  • Analog Input Channels: 12
  • DC Current per I/O Pin: 40 mA
  • DC Current for 3.3V Pin: 50 mA
  • Flash Memory: 32 KB (ATmega32u4) of which 4 KB used by bootloader
  • SRAM: 2.5 KB (ATmega32u4)
  • EEPROM: 1 KB (ATmega32u4)
  • Clock Speed: 16 MHz

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