Archive for the ‘Ethernet’ Category

The Laundruino Lets You Know When Your Clothes Are Done Over The Net

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

[Micha] has a washing machine with an inaccurate  time data displayed on the front panel. How to solve this?

Since it is located in his basement, he hated having to check on the machine continually to know when his clothes were done. Instead of hauling up and down the stairs over and over, he decided to hack in an “end of cycle” notifier of his own.

The washer has an LED that lights when it is finally done doing its thing, so [Micha] removed the LED and soldered in two wires, which he then connected to his Arduino. When the washer is finished and the LED should be lit, the Arduino senses that the input has been pulled low, signaling the end of the cycle. The Arduino was hooked into his home network via an Ethernet shield, enabling him to monitor the process from the comfort of the nearest web browser.

via [hackAday] source [blog.fsfe]

The Roominator Against Conference Room Abuse

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011

If your office suffers of  “conference room abuse” you should build your own “roominator” to coordinate it:

Conference Room Abuse is where people 2 or more people randomly grab a conference without any regard to the schedule for the room. Its a problem many companies face.

[Rapleaf] tried to solve this by creating a system to coordinate the (mis)use of room conferences

The hardware consists of two parts: a display unit that’s posted outside of each conference room, and a controller unit that’s located in Rapleaf’s wiring closet. The display unit shows the current and upcoming reservations and an LED status indicator that can tell you from a distance whether a room is “good to grab”. It also has a pair of buttons – one to make an ad-hoc reservation and one to cancel the current reservation. The controller unit interfaces with all the displays to distribute power and data, both of which run over a single standard Cat5e cable. Both the controller and the displays are Arduino-based.

The software component is a Rails web site that allows for configuration and integrates with Google Calendar. Reservations made via Google Calendar are sync’d with the Roominator, and vice-versa. The controller unit polls the web site for the information it should pass to the displays.

Rapleaf  open sourced the code on github, with all the instructions for the set up.

via [Kinlane] source [Rapleaf]

Chilean Teen Twitts About Earthquakes

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

Sebastian Alegria, a 14 years old Chilean teen created an earthquake warning system based on Arduino, an earthquake detector (bought for less 100 $) and an ethernet shield.

Alegria’s rudimentary yet effective system comes from having survived Chile’s own earthquakes last year and seeing the devastation that covered Japan earlier this year. Keen on finding an inexpensive solution for early earthquake detection, he rigged an Arduino and domestic earthquake detector to tweet seconds before detectable seismic activity. Tweeting from @AlarmaSismos, it has already successfully detected every major earthquake that could be felt from Santiago since May. And it’s piling on the Twitter followers.

via [amazonNews] [HackDay] source [InfoBae]

Arduino Ethernet, ADK Available for purchase

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

 

This week we are releasing a few new products and services. We begin with the Arduino Ethernet and the Arduino Mega ADK.

The Arduino Ethernet combines a regular Arduino board with the Ethernet Shield into a single board designed to power your internet of things projects. It has the ability (if fitted with an optional module) to be powered directly from the ethernet cable using a standard called “Power over Ethernet“,  this makes ideal for permanent installations in buildings and similar structures.

For example, prototypes of the board have been installed and have been operating for over a year at the “Campari Gallery” museum in Milan Italy relaying sensor data via OSC to video players and other interactive installations with amazing reliability.

You can use any FTDI compatible cable or module to program it. For this purpose we are also releasing a new USB2Serial module that is based on the same circuit that’s used in the Arduino UNO, hacking the firmware on the atmega8u2 will allow you to make amazing stuff with this cheap module.

The Arduino Mega ADK is an exciting new addition to the lineup. Google recently released an Arduino-derived open source accessory development kit (ADK) for Android phones and tablets. This is our take on the platform.

It’s essentially an Arduino Mega 2560 with the addition of a USB Host chip that communicates with the phone and a beefy power supply (the board needs to be able to charge the phone). The communication is implemented using Oleg Mazurov’s USB Host library.

The ADK Sensor Kit makes it incredibly simple to develop with the ADK because there is no need to know anything about electronics, small modular sensors and actuators plug on top of the Mega ADK letting you create protoypes or robust installations in minutes!

Later this week we’ll release a few code examples that will make it very easy for anyone to build Android accessories with Arduino.

We hope you enjoy our new creations.

Arduino Ethernet And The GymArduino Ethernet And the GymArduino Ethernet e La Gestione Della Palestra

Monday, November 15th, 2010

 

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli and Alex Rigamonti have recently finished a server-controlled system to monitor the access of the customers in a gym using a prototype of the Arduino Ethernet, RFID, and digital sensors of a turnstile.

The system was meant to monitor easily the different kind of tickets and timing people may have in a gym. To accomplish that we use a turnstile at the entrance and an RFID reader to authenticate the customer. The RFID reader sends the data to Arduino via serial (TTL). Arduino checks the received data and sends it on a server via ethernet. The server controls and authenticate: ticket, time, day, expiry date and all the credits the customer has. This is the time when the server tells the Arduino to open the turnstile by triggering some relays.

Using the Arduino Ethernet made the all process flexible & cheap: controlling the turnstile, interfacing the RFID and sending the data to a linux server over RJ45.

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli and Alex Rigamonti have recently finished a server-controlled system to monitor the access of the customers in a gym using a prototype of the Arduino Ethernet, RFID, and digital sensors of a turnstile.

The system was meant to monitor easily the different kind of tickets and timing people may have in a gym. To accomplish that we use a turnstile at the entrance and an RFID reader to authenticate the customer. The RFID reader sends the data to Arduino via serial (TTL). Arduino checks the received data and sends it on a server via ethernet. The server controls and authenticate: ticket, time, day, expiry date and all the credits the customer has. This is the time when the server tells the Arduino to open the turnstile by triggering some relays.

Using the Arduino Ethernet made the all process flexible & cheap: controlling the turnstile, interfacing the RFID and sending the data to a linux server over RJ45.

 

DSCN2816

Marco Sangalli ed Alex Rigamonti hanno recentemente portato a termine un progetto molto interessante che aveva come obiettivo il controllo centralizzato degli accessi ad una palestra, via server.

Il sistema è stato ideato per rendere più facile la gestione degli abbonamenti e del flusso in ingresso della palestra. Per far ciò è stato predisposto un tornello all’ingresso del locale con un lettore RFID per effettuare l’autenticazione.

L’utente avvicina la tessera RFID al lettore che a sua volta manda i dati tramite seriale (TTL) ad Arduino. Arduino verifica il dato ricevuto e a sua volta trasmette i dati ad un server tramite ethernet.

Il server effettua il controllo dei dati: esistenza abbonamento associato alla tessera, orario e giorno di accesso consentito, controllo crediti e scadenza dello stesso

A questo punto il server  trasmette  il comando ad Arduino Ethernet per l’apertura del tornello svolta tramite il pilotaggio di relays.

L’utilizzo di Arduino ha reso possibile, con un costo molto contenuto e con un’ottima flessibilità, di interfacciare il tornello, che ha solo ingressi digitali per il comando, ad un server linux tramite la ben nota RJ45.

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