Archive for the ‘All Stars’ Category

Arduino Is You

Tuesday, September 20th, 2011

Maker Faire New York is over and we are seeing a lot of reports and reviews about the new products Arduino has announced, we’re sincerely impressed by the amount of positive feedback and offers of collaboration that we have received.

We are  releasing a two part video extract of  my speech on saturday at Maker Faire New York. The title of the speech is “what’s ahead for Arduino”  and it describes the new products we’ve already announced on friday.

Yesterday we’ve had the pleasure of being slashdotted for the first time in our history with the side effect of being mentioned on a lot of websites. In particular what caught my attention is this article by Steve Rosenboaum on the Huffington Post entitled “What Barack Obama Could Learn From Maker Faire” :

Arduino is the kind of innovation eco-system that The White House could support today. Much like the President’s Fitness Challenge drove health and set goals for the nation, it’s easy to imagine an Arduino White House Challenge that would give young people the goals and rewards to drive big ideas into the economy. Today Dean Kamen’s US First Robotics teams are doing that in high schools across the country. And yet President Obama stays almost entirely silent on technology as if somehow the future of America is about us embracing and revitalizing the past.

Education and Community have always been at the core of Arduino….

Another big deal was the announcement that Radio Shack is going to be stocking Arduino in its thousands of stores. Everybody I met was tremendously excited about this (like we have been throughout the negotiation) and a momentous event for an open source project.

We closed our presentation with “Arduino is You”, this is something we like to remind everybody because the community is the lifeblood of Arduino. Give yourself a round of applause like we did in New York.

 

Is the Rise of Wearable Electronics Finally Here?

Friday, June 24th, 2011

Philip Torrone review and analyses the state of things in Wearable Computing. A must-read:

For decades I’ve wanted interesting, beautiful, and (sometimes) functional electronics on the most personal geographies of all, myself. When I think of “living in the future,” it’s what springs to mind: subtle LEDs, lots of polished metal. In this week’s column I’m going to share some milestones, mistakes, and projects in the world of wearable electronics. From geeky watches to wearable music players — I’ve always wanted to utilize my wrist real estate to my shoes for electronics of some kind. Many of the “wearables” I’m going to share are from my project archives, some are now “real,” and others are products that are out now. I think we’re finally entering an era where wearable electronics can look good and work well.

via [MakeZine]

Must-See Beginner Tutorials For Arduino

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

[Jeremy] made ten Tutorials about Arduino worth our “All Stars” category. He talks about different themes: Blinking Leds [Intro & #2], Electrical Engineering  [#3],  Analog Inputs [#4], Motors & Transistors [#5], Serial Communication & Processing [#6], I2C & Processing [#7], SPI Interfaces [#8], Wireless Communication [#9] and Interrupts [#10].

Thanks to a generous sponsorship from element14, I’m putting together a tutorial series on using the arduino microcontroller platform!  The arduino is a platform that I’ve done several projects with, and I think it is the best possible way for beginners to get acquainted with electronics.  This tutorial series will be aimed at beginner users, but I’m hoping to keep it going with some more advanced topics a few episodes into the future.

thanks Jeremy! ++

via [JeremyBlum] [Element14]

Gameduino Brings Vintage Gaming Back

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

If Kickstarter is nowadays best place to find new (or upcoming) toys to dream about, Gameduino is probably one of the most amazing pieces of hardware I’ve seen hosted there. The shield mounts its own FPGA able of 80ies style graphics and sounds for creating old-school, 8-bit video-games, pre-loaded with numerous sprites and set up for easy connection to a VGA display.

Gameduino is a game adapter for Arduino – or anything else with an SPI interface – built as a single shield that stacks up on top of the Arduino and has plugs for a VGA monitor and stereo speakers.

The sound and graphics are definitely old-school, but thanks to the latest FPGA technology, the sprite capabilities are a step above those in machines from the past.

  • video output is 400×300 pixels in 512 colors
  • all color processed internally at 15-bit precision
  • compatible with any standard VGA monitor (800×600 @ 72Hz)
  • background graphics
    • 512×512 pixel character background
    • 256 characters, each with independent 4 color palette
    • pixel-smooth X-Y wraparound scroll
  • foreground graphics
    • each sprite is 16×16 pixels with per-pixel transparency
    • each sprite can use 256, 16 or 4 colors
    • four-way rotate and flip
    • 96 sprites per scan-line, 1536 texels per line
    • pixel-perfect sprite collision detection
  • audio output is a stereo 12-bit frequency synthesizer
  • 16 independent voices 10-4000 Hz
  • per-voice sine wave or white noise

Have a look at the nice reference poster, its detailed hardware reference or its set of sample programs and library.

support this project on [Kickstarter], via [CrunchGear] [BoingBoing] source [ExCamera]

Stazione Futuro, Un FabLab Tutto Italiano a Torino

Monday, February 28th, 2011

 

Il 17 Marzo inaugura la mostra StazioneFuturo alle “Officine Grandi Riparazioni” di Torino.
Dopo tante mostre sul passato si è pensato di guardare ad un futuro possibile per l’Italia mostrando le idee che già oggi sono sul territorio e che entreranno a far parte della nostra vita nei prossimi dieci anni.
La mostra è curata da Riccardo Luna di Wired che ne ha parlato già a novembre su ItalianValley.

Riccardo ci ha chiesto di sviluppare l’area sul futuro del lavoro e noi abbiamo pensato che una mostra così doveva essere uno spazio vivo dove succedono delle cose. Perciò abbiamo deciso di organizzare un FabLab.

Cos’è un FabLab? un Fabrication Laboratory è un piccolo laboratorio dotato di una serie di macchine controllate da computer che permettono di fabbricare “quasi tutto”. Il concetto nasce da un corso dell’MIT di Boston insegnato da Neil Gershenfeld dove per anni hanno sperimentato come progettare e prototipare nuove tipologie di prodotti usando tecnologie che sembravano limitate alla produzione di massa.

Questo FabLab è a disposizione di tutti. Ci saranno corsi per imparare ad usare le macchine ma anche le tecnologie abilitanti il design digitale (come Processing, Arduino, SketchUp , Grasshopper, Rhino ed altri), Ospiti che ci spiegheranno come questo nuovo modo di lavorare impatterà sul nostro futuro e momenti in cui le macchine saranno utilizzabili da chi ci verrà a trovare.

Per poter far funzionare questo laboratorio abbiamo bisogno di voi!!

Il laboratorio è alla ricerca di 1 collaboratore a tempo pieno, 2 collaboratori part time ed un gruppo di volontari. I collaboratori impareranno ad utilizzare le macchine e le tecniche di design e produzione per poterle insegnare agli altri. Faranno parte dei workshop prima come studenti e poi come insegnanti.
Creeranno connessioni tra il lab e le realtà locali. per questo ci piacerebbe avere studenti delle università di Torino nel team.

Nei prossimi giorni inizieremo a selezionare le persone per il team, se siete interessati inviateci il vostro nominativo qui

Vorremmo cogliere l’occasione per ringraziare queste aziende che con la loro lungimiranza hanno supportato il progetto fornendo i macchinari : SEI , la Roland Italia , C.M.F. Marelli distributore italiano di Zcorp, F.T.A. e Tecnologie Aerodinamiche Srl per la depurazione.

 

UPDATE: Selezioni chiuse. Sono aperte solo più le richieste di volontari- Grazie per il grandissimo seguito.

 

Why the Arduino Won and Why It’s Here to Stay

Friday, February 11th, 2011

Philip Torrone on Makezine debates in a very interesting editorial about the Arduino success, and the ongoing development of new boards similar to our favorite.

In about a week, a rep from a large chip company is going to stop by and show me another “Arduino-like platform,” aka The Arduino Killer. This a pretty regular occurrence around here; every month or so there’s a company or person who wants to make the “next Arduino.” They usually contact me because I’ve covered the Arduino for years, helped get it in the maker world, and I use it daily in my work at Adafruit. I think it’s had an amazing impact on electronic hobbyists and artists, perhaps as much as the personal computer in the early days (Homebrew Computer Club, etc). There are more than 100,000+ Arduinos on the market, and by my estimates, a lot more when you add in the derivatives (approximately 150K as of 2/2011). Within the next 5 to 10 years, the Arduino will be used in every school to teach electronics and physical computing — that’s my prediction. There’s no going back.

Which are the reasons of this success? A must-read sum-up of the different levels that make Arduino well… Arduino.

Keep reading it on [MAKE]

[Grumpy_Mike] Turns 10.000 – A Huge Amount Of Links

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

Long time Arduino user and Arduino Forum Contributor [Grumpy_Mike] posted this morning it’s 10.000th post.

Well with this post I reach the 10,000 mark, which is a lot of posts!
It have been fun and I hope that some of them have been helpful. Apart from the odd odd character most people here have a wicked sense of humor. Thanks Guys.

There are of course questions that continually crop up and I have developed a small list of both my own pages and those from elsewhere that I can use in the appropriate situation. So my Exhibition now is a copy of this list so far. Enjoy:-

It’s a looong list of resources. I’ll spend some time checking here and there.

Thanks [Grumpy_Mike], we wish you some 10.000  posts more. (at least now people have more resources to check before opening a thread…)

via [Arduino Forum]

Arduino Lilypad Collection 2007-2010Arduino Lilypad Collection 2007-2010Arduino Lilypad Collection 2007-2010

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

A collection of  projects made with the Arduino Lilypad / 2007-2010

via [BenBashFord] source [LeahBuechley's Youtube]

A collection of projects made with the Arduino Lilypad / 2007-2010

via [BenBashFord] source [LeahBuechley's Youtube]

A collection of projects made with the Arduino Lilypad / 2007-2010

via [BenBashFord] source [LeahBuechley's Youtube]

Arduino And Flash Tutorials. All Of A Sudden.Arduino And Flash Tutorials. All Of A Sudden.Arduino And Flash Tutorials. All Of A Sudden.

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

If you (like me) get to know the term “software tutorial” related to some professional products like the Adobe Suite, you are going to be quite amazed in seeing Kevin Hoyt introducing Arduino as the Physical counterpart of that high-level, client-friendly, closed-source, wonderful software which is Adobe Flash.

[...] If you like me spend a lot of time -everyday- in front of the computer, and that’s just great..don’t get me wrong…Adobe Developers built some of the collest apps out there…but…what happens when you close your laptop and walk away? For most part web developer just live there in the Ether, you’ve got nothing really to show from your hard day of work…but, that bothers me, so I want to kind of escape the bounds of the computer, and do something more…[...]

This is kind of a deep witnessing. You to judge what that really means.

If you (like me) get to know the term “software tutorial” related to some professional products like the Adobe Suite, you are going to be quite amazed in seeing Kevin Hoyt introducing Arduino as the Physical counterpart of that high-level, client-friendly, closed-source, wonderful software which is Adobe Flash.

[...] If you like me spend a lot of time -everyday- in front of the computer, and that’s just great..don’t get me wrong…Adobe Developers built some of the collest apps out there…but…what happens when you close your laptop and walk away? For most part web developer just live there in the Ether, you’ve got nothing really to show from your hard day of work…but, that bothers me, so I want to kind of escape the bounds of the computer, and do something more…[...]

This is kind of a deep witnessing. You to judge what that really means.

If you (like me) get to know the term “software tutorial” related to some professional products like the Adobe Suite, you are going to be quite amazed in seeing Kevin Hoyt introducing Arduino as the Physical counterpart of that high-level, client-friendly, closed-source, wonderful software which is Adobe Flash.

[...] If you like me spend a lot of time -everyday- in front of the computer, and that’s just great..don’t get me wrong…Adobe Developers built some of the collest apps out there…but…what happens when you close your laptop and walk away? For most part web developer just live there in the Ether, you’ve got nothing really to show from your hard day of work…but, that bothers me, so I want to kind of escape the bounds of the computer, and do something more…[...]

This is kind of a deep witnessing. You to judge what that really means.

(more…)

The future of Arduino

Wednesday, July 21st, 2010

Chris Anderson met Gianluca and Massimo last week. He wrote a wonderful post full of pictures about the future of Arduino (see alco Arduino Blog) and the arduino PCB production.

A week ago I spent a day with the Arduino team in and around Milan (production lead Gianluca Martino at left above, with raw Arduino PCBs coming off the fab). Here’s a quick report.

First, we talked a lot about the Punto Uno (“Version 1.0″) release. It’s kinda incredible that Arduino is still described as Alpha software and stuck in decimal versions after all these years. Well, no more. In September, it will finally be released in a 1.0 version.

In italian, Punto and Uno is two name of different FIAT cars ;) . He obviously means Uno Punto Zero, which is 1.0.

read more

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